Category: Blogs

Invitation to Learn About the New Illinois Chapter of Urban Wood Network

I invite you to attend this meeting to join the discussion of what comes next for Illinois and urban wood. I will share why Illinois became a Chapter of UWN. In addition, I will be joined by Kari Devine of the Urban Wood Network. She will provide information about UWN membership benefits including branding, marketing, and educational resources.

The meeting will take place from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monday, September 20.

Please register in advance to attend.

Hello Illinois Urban Wood supporters:

Please join us in an upcoming Zoom meeting to learn about the new Illinois Chapter of the Urban Wood Network (UWN).

Illinois has a long history of utilizing the resource of urban wood and we recently became a member of this larger UWN national movement.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Best regards,

Erika Horigan
Horigan Urban Forest Products, Inc.
Urban Wood Network, Illinois




Romans participate in a didactic urban wood event

Rome Urban Wood WorkshopBY RICH CHRISTIANSON

Franco Paolinelli, who has become our de facto Italian correspondent, shared some info and photos from a recent community event at which some 30 kids got to enjoy the tactile sensation of making things with wood. It was the first of three planned community urban wood workshops in Rome.

“Since 2018 our proposal o conduct ‘Laboratori del Legno Degli Alberi di Roma’ i.e. Roman urban wood workshops, is acquiring popularity,” said Paolinelli, a professional arborist. “In Rome. we have a tree pest, Ailanthus altissima, (tree of heaven, an exotic invasive species) growing all over where maintenance lacks. One interesting result is its wood is great for workshops.

“I collect pruning remains in arboricultural jobs, asking arborist firms to cut them in 30-40 cm long, 3-6 cm in diameter segments. I put them in strong bags and carry them to the workshop site.”

Rome Urban wood workshop“This particular workshop took place within ‘Parco dell’ Appia Antica,’ a huge green area, crossing the whole city of Rome that hosts lots of ancient Roman monuments. It was a didactic, recreational, activity conducted with segments of urban wood, mainly pruning remains. The kids had a lot of fun transforming the wood into objects using tools with the assistance of our experts.”

He added that the event was an opportunity to inform people of the value of urban wood in hopes that they recognize the importance of keeping as much of it as possible out of the waste stream and capitalizing on its carbon sequestration. 

“At the end of the three workshops, we put many kilos of urban wood to use and placing the wood objects the kids made into their homes, and saving them and their carbon from landfills.” 

Rome Urban Wood Workshop 

 

  

 

 

 



Watch Black Oak Go From Logs to Table

By Rich Christianson



I really like this 2019 video of a repurposed black oak felled near the Mill Mountain Zoo in Roanoke, VA. 

In less than 4 minutes, it shows how the “declining” tree was removed, yielding three logs each weighing upwards of 3 tons. From there, the logs are milled, kiln-dried, and made into tables by St. Pierre Sawmill and Woodworking; a member of the Virginia Urban Wood Group.

It’s worth checking out.

 



Bringing New Life to Fallen Urban Trees

Cities in the United States could plant an estimated 400 million trees, making them an essential player in tree restoration. Photo by Vladimir Kudinov/Unsplash

By Todd Gartner and Ben Christensen

The city is a difficult place for a tree to survive. Compared to their counterparts in the countryside, urban trees generally get less water, suffer more intense heat, compete for space with unyielding infrastructure and frequently become riddled with disease and pests. As a result, many cities are stuck with a lot of dead trees every year.

Cities and private contractors cut them down and usually turn them into firewood, mulch or haul them to the landfill. Often, cities replant fewer trees than they remove, leading to a net loss in canopy cover over time.

However, these trees don’t have to go to waste. “Reforestation hubs” are an exciting model that will save these trees from landfills and instead find new uses for them, such as repurposing for furniture or flooring. This can help cities deal with dead trees while saving money, creating new jobs, addressing long-term public health goals and mitigating climate change at scale.

The Urban Wood Opportunity
Restoring trees to the United States landscape offers big benefits for the climate and communities alike. The scale of the opportunity is staggering: landscapes across the United States alone could support 60 billion new trees. This would sequester up to 540 million tons of CO2 per year – equivalent to replacing 117 million gasoline cars with electric vehicles running on clean electricity. The United States could plant an estimated 400 million of these trees in cities. Capturing this opportunity will take financial resources and concerted effort by a variety of public and private partners.

While waiting for government funding or voluntary private sector finance to kick in at a meaningful scale, cities across the country hold a massive and untapped resource. However, this resource is going to waste – literally.

Every year, 36 million trees come down in cities across the United States due to old age, disease and new development, resulting in economic losses of up to $786 million each year. Much of this wood could become valuable products, but instead often gets chipped, thrown in a landfill or burned as firewood. Rethinking urban wood waste could be an unexpected climate and economic solution, turning a burden on the climate and city budgets into a financial engine for reforestation across the broader landscape.

This opportunity is the impetus for the concept of reforestation hubs, pioneered by Cambium CarbonCities4Forests and the Arbor Day Foundation, which will be working with city officials to create the nation’s first reforestation hubs by 2022 through a TNC Natural Climate Change Solutions Accelerator Grant.

What is a Reforestation Hub?
In their simplest form, reforestation hubs are public-private partnerships that save cities money and generate revenue to plant and maintain more trees by diverting downed urban trees from landfills. Instead of going to waste, downed trees are sorted and turned into their highest and best use like furniture, cross-laminated timber, lumber, flooring, compost or mulch. This saves cities money and generates revenue to plant and maintain more trees, building a vibrant circular economy and allowing cities to better combat climate change. In the process, reforestation hubs also support public health and economic growth by creating jobs in green infrastructure through employing people at mills, nurseries and new planting initiatives.

Despite the value urban wood can provide, critical obstacles stand in the way of utilizing them. Cities lack the infrastructure to make fallen trees valuable, and wood product supply chains are not structured around urban wood products. Addressing these two gaps is the first step in creating a functioning reforestation hub. Doing so will require investments in sort yards and mill infrastructure to process incoming wood waste, bringing together city officials, urban millers, artisans, furniture makers, biochar facilities and composting operations. Additionally, it will require building value chains that connect these urban wood ecosystems to the broader market.

Urban wood champions are chipping away at this vision, but with slow progress. Building a reforestation hub requires immense collaboration, and urban wood is a complex raw material to build consistent supply chains around. Reforestation hubs break this log jam by bringing together four ingredients:

  1. City-level commitments to divert wood from city agency and contractor operations, buy urban wood for city operations and establish long-term planting plans.
  2. Private finance from philanthropic and impact investors for necessary infrastructure.
  3. A market incubation platform that drives consumer awareness and leverages technology to connect buyers and sellers.
  4. A social impact mission that reinvests profits from the new urban wood economy into tree planting in reforestation hub cities and the surrounding landscapes.

This vision builds on the work of the Baltimore Wood Project, which creates furniture and other high-value products from dead urban trees and reclaimed lumber from houses facing demolition. Baltimore created a network of suppliers and buyers of reclaimed lumber and invested heavily in Camp Small, a sort yard that can process their existing waste stream and turn it into value.

Growing New Opportunities for City Trees
Reforestation hubs not only bring value through using dead trees, but by creating a path for planting new trees in cities. This comes with numerous public health benefits, including purifying air and water, helping to reduce respiratory disease and decreasing heat. Trees also increase storm water retention to ease stress on city sewer systems.

Tree canopy health often follows wealth and racial lines in cities, depriving underserved communities of these benefits. Reforestation hubs, by applying the principles of tree equity, can provide funds to improve tree health and plant more trees that benefit these communities. They can also provide new employment opportunities through the markets created for previously under-utilized urban wood.

Making the Most of Fallen Trees
With the financial strain caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, cities may face pressure to defer tree maintenance and replanting, despite the many benefits urban trees provide. At the same time, well-planned reforestation holds the potential to improve the respiratory health of residents and increased urban tree canopies can help cities meet their climate goals. Reforestation hubs offer a multitude of benefits, building new revenue to help fund tree care and planting as well as providing a path to financing broader tree work in cities. As a result, reforestation hubs have immense potential to become economic, public health and climate boons for cities in the face of intersecting crises.

Stay up to date on this exciting work and encourage your city to join the movement here.

This blog was originally published on WRI’s Insights.

Todd Gartner is the director of Cities4Forests and WRI’s Natural Infrastructure Initiative.

Ben Christensen is a former carbon removal research intern at World Resources Institute.

 



Chicago City Council Debates Urban Forestry Advisory Board To Address Declining Tree Population

Photo: Openlands

By Zachary Mauer 
Associate Editor
Loyola University Chicago School of Law, JD/MPP 2022

Across the United States, metropolitan areas are experiencing a net loss of about 36 million trees every year. That amounts to about 175,000 acres of lost tree cover. Meanwhile, Chicago loses more than 10,000 trees every year due to, in part, inefficient tree trimming and management. Fewer trees means less shade and worse air quality. In response, several Chicago City Council Aldermen are proposing the Urban Forestry Advisory Board (“UFAB”) in order to assess current policies and propose innovative ways to protect Chicago’s tree population.           

Chicago has a tree-trimming problem
In 2019, the City of Chicago Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) released a report highlighting ways in which the Department of Streets and Sanitation’s Bureau of Forestry could improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their tree-trimming program. Since the creation of 311 in 1999, the city has used a reactive approach to tree trimming by responding only to resident’s complaints. As a result, the Bureau of Forestry spent 75% of its time addressing these 311 requests, causing 40% of parkway trees (approximately 206,000) to not be trimmed in 10 or more years.   

According to an independent report issued in 2009, a grid-based approach to tree trimming would reduce the average crew’s travel time by 35% and the average cost per tree trim by 60%. This could increase the daily tree trimming by 147% and 87% more addresses receiving services over the course of a year.

CBS News reported in January that that Chicago residents across the city have been complaining that 311 requests are being marked completed before the job was done. Some residents are forced to spend money to repair damage on their homes or cars caused by falling branches. Residents of West Englewood are worried that a falling branch could seriously injure someone.

City workers are avoiding completing these tree-trimming requests by marking the requests as “no tree” or “no such address.” The city’s response has been that the pandemic, as well as a large storm, have kept them busy over the past year. Still, other major cities that use a proactive, cyclical, or grid-based approach include New York City, Toronto, Los Angeles, as well as Chicago’s neighbors Evanston, Oak Lawn, and Park Ridge.

Environmental and health risks associated with loss of trees
One of the main consequences of losing trees in a large city is the urban heat island effect. Shade from trees, together with evaporation of the water their leaves transpire, can help reduce peak summer temperatures in their vicinity by 2 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit. In Davis, CA, researchers found that shade from trees reduced the surface temperature of asphalt by up to 36 degrees F, and of the passenger compartments of parked cars by 47 degrees F.

Also, urban trees reduce concentrations of particulate matter, the most damaging type of air pollution. A study of 10 U.S. cities found that urban trees remove enough particulate matter to reduce annual health impacts by amounts ranging from $1.1 million in Syracuse, NY, to $60.1 million in New York City. A 2015 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that in the 15-state area and 17-year period covered, more than 15,000 additional deaths from cardiovascular conditions such as heart attack and stroke occurred as a result of urban tree loss.       

Further, nitrogen dioxide is one of the main contributors to smog and one of the six leading air pollutants identified by the Environmental Protection Agency. In a study conducted in Portland, tree cover had a significant effect on nitrogen dioxide levels and residents’ respiratory health by area. In higher-tree areas, young kids were estimated to have avoided missing more than 7,000 school days annually because of asthma attacks.           

Chicago Urban Forestry Advisory Board
The proposed Urban Forestry Advisory Board (UFAB) would have seven ex officio members and six appointed members. The seven ex officio members would be the Chief Sustainability Officer, Chair of the Committee on Energy and Environmental Protection, General Superintendent & Chief Executive Officer of Streets and Sanitation, Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, Commissioner of Water Management, and Commissioner of the Department of Planning and Development. The six appointed members would be representatives from two nongovernmental organizations that participate in the Chicago Region Trees Initiative, a representative from a nongovernmental community organization, two representatives from a tree service business, and a representative from an academic arborist community. 

UFAB’s duties would include developing and annually updating an Urban Forestry Management Plan, as well as recommending legislation based on viewing and assessing current city policies, procedures, and expenditures. UFAB would also facilitate a public education of urban forestry and establish a Heritage Tree program that identifies trees of special significance. Other major cities with forest advisory boards include San Diego, which has a 15-member board appointed by the mayor, and Seattle where they have a 13-member board comprised of various professionals and community members.       

The ordinance to create UFAB was first introduced last summer, but was put on the back burner as the pandemic raged on. Now, the Chicago City Council hopes to introduce the ordinance again in the coming months.         

The City of Chicago’s Inspector General Joe Ferguson said it best: “A thriving and healthy urban forest is critical to mitigating ever-mounting climate change concerns like the urban heat island effect and excessive storm water runoff, and recent studies have revealed stark differences across city neighborhoods that generally correlate with tree canopy percentages. Chicago’s communities and individuals particularly stand to benefit from a more efficient and equitable city service, with obvious environmental health benefits, including cleaner air, cooling, and reduction of stress in children. Strategic, rather than reactive, tree care also prevents property damage, utility interruptions, and street closures.”



Urban Wood Italian Style

By Franco Paolinelli
Silvicultura Agrocultura Paesaggio, Rome, Italy

Editor’s note: I have had the pleasure of corresponding with Franco Paolinelli since January of 2019. He initiated the conversation after finding Illinois Urban Wood in a web search. Over the last couple of years, we have shared several emails detailing our mutual interest in urban wood utilization. What follows is a paper Franco sent me about his urban forestry association’s urban wood activities in Rome. –– Rich Christianson

Logs from trees removed for an outdoor theatre were converted into benches.

OUR ORGANIZATION
Silvicultura Agrocultura Paesaggio (S.A.P.) is a small, non-profit, network of experts and firms, established in 1993 to improve urban green area management and related social and cultural services.  

The association operates mainly in Rome, a metropolitan area with lots of public and private green areas, then with huge amounts of trees to be pruned and renewed, then huge amounts of wood to be disposed.

Within this frame, in 2004 SAP launched the following project:

 URBAN TREES’ TIMBER: AN UNKNOWN RESOURCE

1) Assumptions

Wood is made by carbon polymers, produced by the plants with water and CO2, with the support of solar energy, through the photosynthesis process. The process releases oxygen in the atmosphere.

More trees equals more wood, which means more CO2 is taken away from the atmosphere and more oxygen us added, as recognized also by the Kyoto Protocol. 

Urban trees produce a huge amount of urban wood: Public and private trees, shrubs, hedges in private and public gardens provide security and support public health. They must be pruned and cyclically renewed. These processes produce urban wood.

Public-owned trees in the City of Rome Italy are estimated to be around 330,000. All trees of the city may be more then 1,000,000. An annual renewal of 1% means producing 10,000 logs that could provide at least 20.000 cubic meters of lumber.

What happens now: Generally speaking, wood companies do not appreciate urban lumber. Their manufacturing needs normally require a steady stream of very homogeneous logs that urban forests cannot provide.

As a result, most unwanted urban wood goes mainly in landfills.

In some cases, the trees are chipped then composted or sold to be used for for energy production. But most of it, particularly large logs and big branches, are just left to decay. This process may wind up converting carbon polymers into a greenhouse gas, maybe CO2 or even worse methane.

 2) TRENDS 

Urban timber quality is increasing: Modern arboriculture and greater attention to urban green resources are producing better quality urban trees. Then, at the end of their useful life cycle, better logs can be realized.

This trend also implies that there is a reduction of iron in trees in terms of nails, screws, etc. As the quantity of iron pieces embedded in urban wood decreases, damage to sawmills and sawblades will likely decrease.

Cities may express a multifunctional market: Urban areas may express increased demand for creative arts and crafts, including those with intrinsic symbolic values based on where the trees lived. There is also the potential to use more of the wood for didactic, therapeutic and training purposes.

All of possibilities may increase the appreciation for uneven logs and branches with unique shapes.

 3) PROJECT

 What could happen: The biggest challenge is changing people to view removed trees not as a waste but as a  resource.

An arborist trained on the subject will see the “resource” already on the tree, while pruning or cutting it in pieces. Then, even with a simple chainsaw, he may be able to produce a resource, in terms of pieces for crafts, art and furniture.

Beyond that,  now a days, portable mills are readily available. These machines can be used to convert logs and large branches into lumber. These operations may also take place where the tree has been removed.

A dying tree removed from a park, may return a benches, tables or playground equipment for the park itself.

Urban timber could be used to produce outdoor or indoor furniture, as well as art and design works or common use objects. Smaller branches could be made into items utilized for didactic and therapeutic activities.

Thus, just leaves, small branches and sawdust would be left for composting or used for energy.

4) URBAN WOOD UTILIZATION IMPLIES POSITIVE EFFECTS

Cultural and social effects:

  • Involving people in urban timber work may help to deliver important environmental messages. For instance: Wood is a sustainable carbon stock. Its use may help in controlling greenhouse gases.
  • Urban wood manipulation may help us, mainly our youngsters, to limit the drift within the “virtual world.” In fact, wood, the first matter humanity manipulated, will help us to remember that we have hands capable to do lots of things in the real world.
  • Several jobs within this field may be implemented by disadvantaged people, providing an inclusive effect.

 

 Environmental effects:

  • Carbon sink: Wood is the carbon that trees assimilate. Preserving wood, as art works or furniture for example, increases carbon sequestration. Its quantity may be defined. 
  • Sustainable energy production: Leaves and other leftovers may be utilized for this purpose.
  • New plantings: Urban timber markets may generate economic resources and motivations to plant more trees at both the public and private scale.
  • Improved maintenance: The urban timber market may motivate better care for trees. A full circle urban Forestry approach may take place. 
  • The availability of valuable urban timber may decrease the demand for tropical tree use. That may provide some help in saving environmentally relevant forests and in reducing import expenses.

Socio-economic effects: Urban timber production and transformation, within a multifunctional urban market, may develop through small and medium enterprises. These businesses can create jobs, along the whole supply chain from the grounded tree to timber production, design, art, didactic, social therapy and so on.

Why urban timber production may be convenient:

  • As urbanized areas grow, then the number of trees, planted and wild, must grow as well. Their required maintenance ultimately implies the production of urban wood. A great part of that may be converted into valuable urban timber. A multifunctional urban market may give a value even to species under-appreciated by the wood industry. 

  • Urban timber may have certified symbolic values based on the site where it comes from. Timber materials may, then become: “Rome trees’ timber,” “Central Park trees’ timber,” Tivoli Park trees’ timber” etc. In a multifunctional market, a board or an object with a certified origin may have an added value.
      
  • Based on CO2 sequestration a professional certification may be associated with a board or an object. Then, for instance, an owner may buy an urban timber dinner table and state to his hosts, “My dinner table is a 25kg carbon sink.”
  • Urban Forests and their timber may become relevant CO2 sinks that a city may include in its carbon balance in line with the Kyoto treaty.
  • New tools are available to produce timber from urban logs.
  • Timber transformation may be multi functional: production of objects, education, social services, therapy, environment, etc.

5) ACTIONS TAKEN

Since 2004 S.A.P. has taken logs and large branches of trees removed in private and public gardens, for safety and health reasons, to produce simple furniture pieces, as well as materials to conduct workshops with children and socially disadvantaged people.

Most furniture piece produced have been accompanied with a certificate stating their origin and a rough estimation of their carbon content.

In 2006 S.A.P. requested the Vatican administration to take the St. Peter Square Christmas tree at the end of the exposition period. S.A.P. used St. Peter Christmas tree logs and branches in experimental productions and workshops. 

In 2016 S.A.P. proposals on urban timber were joined by “A Roma Insieme”, an association focused on jail population support. A training activity was, then, arranged for inmates in Regina Coeli Institute, in 2017 and 2018.

5) PILOT PROJECT

In 2018 an interesting pilot project took place within the Leopardi elementary school of Rome to use trees removed on its land for an outdoor theatre project.

Steps: S.A.P., in the winter 2018 had some meetings with Mr. Giovanni Figà Talamanca, in charge for “Educational Politics” in the I’ Municipality of Rome, presenting him the project “Urban Timber from the Trees of Rome.”

The Giacomo Leopardi school lays in a large garden, rich in Pinus tress. School and Municipality Administration were already on the way to have 12 Pinus (Pinus pinea and P. halepensis) removed to increase garden safety.

Mr. Talamanca was able to link our project and the Pinus planned removal. The School administrations approved our proposal to convert some logs in outdoor furniture and a contract was signed.

The arboricultural firm in charge of the job was able to cut the trees, preserving several logs. The alumni parents’ association was involved to express proposals. The idea of the outdoor theatre was launched and approved. Project guidelines were defined and approved by the school direction.

S.A.P. experts, with a “Granberg” frame mounted on a Stihl machine saw milled 30 logs producing flattened ones, boards and short sections.

A volunteering parents’ group, named for the occasion “log rollers,” participated in locating the logs in the theatre selected site, in assembling the benches, in smoothing and in painting them.

The Theatre: The following furniture pieces were produced and placed:

  • N. 6 big round logs 2m long;
  • N. 19 flattened logs to be used as benches;
  • N. 8 benches assembled with boards on orthogonal sections 30cm high; and
  • N. 20 orthogonal sections sits.

Results:

 1 – For the school and the administration::

  • Reduced costs to obtain the theatre; and
  • Project administrative process definition.

2 – For the parent volunteers:

  • School garden improvement; and
  • Participation, ability acquisition.

 3 – For S.A.P.:

  • Working days;
  • Project administrative process definition; and
  • Urban Timber idea promotion.

4 – For the Environment:

  • Landfill prevented: 5 tons — 30% of the total biomass produced; and
  • Estimated carbon stock in the logs’ theatre: 2,5 tons.

5- For Local Economies:

  • Investment in local businesses.

6 – Development Programs:

  • Interest expressed by local institutions, mainly in the artistic environment, is increasing.

 



CBS News Features Report on Baltimore Urban Wood Project

Furniture made from urban lumber promotes sustainability, job growth in cities

The Baltimore Urban Wood Project was showcased in a report aired by CBS This Morning on Dec. 12, 2020.

CBS News reporter Errol Barnett focused on how wood is being salvaged from dilapidated rowhouses and urban trees in Baltimore to produce furniture, create jobs and keep these repurposed materials from ending up in the  waste stream.

In addition to the Baltimore Urban Wood Project, the report features representatives of Urban Wood Rescue of Sacramento, CA, and Room & Board of Minneapolis, MN, which has used a lot of Baltimore urban wood to make furniture.

 



Video: NC Urban Wood Sawmill & Vacuum Kiln Webinar

In a webinar recorded on Dec. 1, Avery Earwood, owner of Wild Edge Woodcraft of Rougemont, NC, demonstrates his Timber Harvester bandsaw and iDRY Plus vacuum kiln. He also discusses his company’s role in the North Carolina urban wood movement from tree removal to finished “live edge” furniture. 



Iowa Derecho: So many trees lost, so little wood saved

A crew cleans up tree debris following the Aug. 10 derecho in Cedar Rapids, IA.

By Rich Christianson

The wicked Aug. 10 derecho that spawned tornadoes, high winds and torrential rains throughout the Midwest sent me to take cover in a basement for the second time in my life. One look at the fast-approaching gray green front was enough to convince me that the tornado alerts for the northwest side of Chicago were more than mere local news hype. I was instantly reminded of the 1967 tornadoes that struck Oak Lawn, IL, that caused my parents to shoo my siblings and me downstairs. That event claimed 58 lives.

Fortunately for us, the worst of the storm in my area were a few downed trees and many heavy branches. Many in Iowa were not so lucky.

According to the Washington Post, the Iowa derecho was the most costly thunderstorm in U.S. history. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimated damage in Iowa and other midwestern states at $7.6 billion. That’s higher than any recorded tornado and more than many hurricanes.

Cedar Rapids, IA, was particularly hard hit. Wind gusts of up to 140 mph plummeted the area. Electrical power was knocked out for nearly all 133,000 residents and more than 1,000 homes were rendered unlivable.

The derecho also wiped out about 20 percent of Iows’s crops and felled trees by the hundreds. 

Six weeks after the devastating event, the Des Moines Register reported that the city’s cleanup crews had transported 9,291 loads of tree debris to a huge metropolitan compost site.

Several other articles posted in the wake of the Iowa derecho reported how local woodworkers and artists were using wood from felled trees to make craft items, most of them being sold or auctioned to support relief efforts. But that’s a drop in the ocean considering the massive amount of wood that could potentially be repurposed. 

No doubt, the number one priority in this type of situation is clearing downed trees in the interests of public safety. But somewhere after the smoke clears, it would be optimal to have a plan for repurposing as many of these trees as practically possible. Doing so begins by integrating urban wood utilization into disaster planning. 

I think we’ll get there, but we’re clearly not there yet. We still have far to many metropolitan cities to integrate urban wood recovery into their urban forestry initiatives. But perhaps the Iowa derecho can serve as a wake-up call for municipalities to realize that even if they can’t plan what do to with trees after a natural disaster, that they can at least figure out what might be done to gain value from the sycamore tree removed from the Smith’s parkway.

Baby steps…

 

 


World Demand for Massive Wood Slabs to Surpass $2B By 2030

Lumber Shack wood slab inventory.

 

According to a new report by FactMR, the massive wood slabs market is expected to show a positive growth outlook in the coming years. This is attributed to increasing per capita spending and improving lifestyle in developing regions.

In developed regions, demand for wooden furniture has seen a significant upsurge over the last few years, due to the various benefits that this type of furniture offers, such as high durability and better aesthetics as compared to metal furniture. Customers prefer customized furniture, as it allows them to decorate their house and office space as per specific requirements. Therefore, wooden furniture is favored over metal furniture, as it offers ease for customization.

Massive wood slabs are large pieces of wood cut from trees, and are used in furniture and cabinetry. They are preferred due to the desire to have different texture and moisture content in furniture, which gives off an appearance unique to different wood types. Therefore, it is projected that, demand for massive wood slabs will grow significantly in near future, expanding the massive wood slabs market size to a great extent.

Massive Wood Slabs Market Analysis by Wood Type
As the popularity of wood furniture is growing across developed regions, manufacturers or sawmill owners are introducing wood slabs of different wood species into their product portfolios. Companies are focusing on maximizing their massive wood slabs offering list.

Different species offer numerous advantages in different weather conditions, such as optimized durability, adequate moisture control, different aesthetics, etc. In Fact.MR’s study, it is revealed that, mahogany and rosewood are the most popular wood types in the global massive wood slabs market, and they are projected to collectively create an absolute $ opportunity worth US$ 245 million during the forecast period of 2020 to 2030.

Massive Wood Slabs Market Analysis by Sales Channel
Global emergence of the e-Commerce sales channel has influenced the wood industry on a huge scale. In developed countries, leading wood industry players have either established their own e-Commerce sites or have made their products available on other popular e-Commerce portals.

Several companies have also started dedicated e-Commerce sites for wood products. For instance, U.S.-based wood products company KC Custom Hardwoods has started its own e-Commerce website for the sale of its massive wood slabs across the country. Another U.S.-based company, The Lumber Shack, has tied up with an international e-Commerce site for sale of its products, internationally.

In Fact.MR’s study, the timber online stores sales channel in poised to witness the fastest growth at a CAGR 5%, and account for around 17% value share of the global massive wood slabs market by the end of the forecast period.

Regional Outlook of Massive Wood Slabs Market
Developed regions such as North America and Europe dominate the global massive wood slabs market share, with a combined share of around 59%. High per capita income and improved lifestyle have led to maximum consumption of massive wood slabs in these regions. However, developing regions such as Asia Pacific are also showing a positive growth outlook, and are expected to create enormous opportunities for massive wood slab manufacturers in the coming years. In Fact.MR’s study, East Asia and South Asia & Oceania are projected to showcase growth at CAGR of 5.4% and 5.6%, respectively, during the forecast period.

Massive Wood Slabs Market Competitive Analysis: Key Players Focus on Expanding Product Portfolio
The global massive wood slabs market is fragmented in nature, with small, privately-owned saw mills serving the maximum number of customers. Leading players are focusing on introducing various wood species into their product portfolios in order to offer a variety of massive wood slabs that suit the particular requirements of customers, such as different weather conditions and aesthetics.

For instance, Cook Woods, an Orlando, U.S.-based wood products company, introduced massive wood slabs of more than 250 wood species into its product offering list.

COVID-19 Impact on Massive Wood Slabs Market
The unprecedented impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is burgeoning, as nationwide lockdowns across most countries is ongoing. Most companies have had to either stop production or work with less than half capacity due to the imposition of restrictions. Apart from this, the supply chain has also been impacted, substantially, and retail avenues such as furniture showrooms have been shut for now.

Movement in the global massive wood slabs market has been observed to be sluggish in the first two quarters of 2020. However, some relaxation in lockdown measures is implemented in most countries, which has enabled the resuming of businesses to some extent. But as we speak, some countries are again imposing stringent lockdowns as infection rates spike once again. For instance, on July 7 2020, the Government of Australia announced a six-week stringent lockdown in Melbourne. Such developments are poised to cause sluggish growth of the global massive wood slabs market over the next couple of fiscal quarters of 2020.

Global Massive Wood Slabs Market: Scope of the Report
Fact.MR published an exclusive forecast report on the massive wood slabs market for the period of 2020-2030. The foremost objective of the massive wood slabs market report is to pitch spearhead insights on the market scenario, demand generators, and technological advancements in the market. Also, the massive wood slabs market study addresses key dynamics that are expected to diversify the adoption and future prominence of massive wood slabs.                 

The report on the massive wood slabs market begins with an executive overview, in which, product definition has been provided. The report further proceeds with the taxonomy of the massive wood slabs market, elaborating on key segments. The report also outlines visionary insights on the dynamics of the massive wood slabs market, including the drivers, restraints, opportunities, trends, and pricing analysis, along with key buying factors.

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