Search Results for "wood-mizer"

Wood-Mizer Acquires Swedish Manufacturer of 4-sided Planer/Moulders

Wood-Mizer has expanded its product range to include woodworking equipment with the acquisition of Swedish company, MOReTENs AB. Included are four-sided planer/moulders, table saws, spindle moulders and CNC routers, plus log home building machinery.

“Throughout our history, Wood-Mizer has been committed to providing the best quality equipment to process logs into finished wood products,” said Wood-Mizer President and CEO Richard Vivers. “The affordable and versatile moulder and planer product lines from MOReTENs have been proven worldwide for decades, and are now backed by the high-quality service and support network customers expect from Wood-Mizer.”

The founder and owner of MOReTENs, Bo Mårtensson, has joined Wood-Mizer as the General Director of the factory in Ostersund, Sweden. The factory in Sweden marks Wood-Mizer’s fifth manufacturing plant throughout the world including three facilities in the USA and one in Poland.

Wood-Mizer recently began offering new planers/moulders under the Wood-Mizer name through its distribution network. Read the full press release about the acquisition.

Wood-MIzer is the lead sponsor of the seminar “The Urban Wood Revolution Is NOW! Come Join the Movement,” scheduled for Aug. 24 at the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta.



Wood-Mizer Offers Free Urban Sawmilling Guide

Wood-Mizer-Urban-Sawmill-Cover

Salvaging, Sawmilling, and Marketing Urban Wood Guide is a free down-loadable publication available from Wood-Mizer of Indianapolis, IN.

“As we see it, every urban tree we use for lumber is one less tree that must be cut from our forests and one less piece of green waste that would be dumped in our landfills,” Wood-Mizer, a manufacturer of stationary and mobile sawmills, says. “Everyone we talk to about harvesting urban timber is enthusiastic about the idea. We hear from people all over the world who want to know what they can do in their local cities and towns to help make a difference.”

The urban sawmill guide includes an intro and other information from note urban wood expert Sam Sherrill, case studies of urban wood businesses and other information for those looking to enter or grow their place in the urban wood movement.

The guide is free to download and is an adjunct of Wood-Mizer’s new Urban Sawmilling video series.

Click here to access the guide.

 

 



Indy Urban Hardwood Stars in New Wood-Mizer Urban Sawmill Video Series

Wood-Mizer of Indianapolis, IN, chose to profile Indy Urban Hardwood Co. for Episode One of its Urban Sawmill Video Series.

Learn how Brian Presnell of Indy Urban Hardwood utilizes his portable sawmill to salvage fallen and diseased urban trees in Indianapolis. In addition to providing high-quality salvaged wood furniture to homeowners, Indy Urban Hardwood Co. works closely with Herron School of Art by donating salvaged wood to art students to learn woodworking.

Check out Indy Urban Hardwood’s website.

 

 



Wood-Mizer Issues Call for Personal Best Contest Entries

Wood-Mizer-Personal-Best-ContestWood-Mizer of Indianapolis, IN, is accepting entries for its 2017 Personal Best Contest.

Since 1985, the contest has provided Wood-Mizer sawmill owners in the United States and Canada an  opportunity to showcase their dream projects built with lumber from their mill. Categories include homes, barns, cabins, sheds, tables and gazebos.

Twenty-five winners will share more than $20,000 in prize credits that can be used toward the purchase of any WoodMizer products, parts or accessories.

Contestants who submit their entry forms and photos by the June 14 deadline will receive a Wood-Mizer sports hat.

The final deadline for entering is July 31.

For more information abut the contest, rules and to enter, click here.

Related: See article about  urban wood-related  winners of Wood-Mizer’s 2016 Business Best contest.



Four Urban Wood Firms Snare Wood-Mizer Awards

Four enterprises recognized in Wood-Mizer LLC’s 2016 Business Best Contest are participating in their respective local urban wood movements.

The competition included first, second and third place winners in each of three categories. Entrants were judged on business practices, ethics, organization, and maintaining high-quality standards throughout their operations. Winners shared in $12,250 in prize credits and were profiled in The Wood-Mizer Way magazine.

Kamuela Hardwoods of Kamuela, HI, won first place in the Hydraulic Mills category. The company is going against the grain in offering lumber and specialty slabs from salvaged trees as an alternative to building materials that are predominantly imported. Kamuela Hardwoods’ customers make dining tables, bar tops, flooring, mouldings and trim, fence posts and even ukuleles.

J & M Logging & Sawmill of Fair Grove, MO, won first place for Manual Sawmills. Jacob Whitehead, who also possesses carpentry skills, operates a one-man sawmill operation focused on milling local trees.

The Wood Cycle of Oregon, WI, tied for third place in the Hydraulic Sawmill category. The Wood Cycle both mills and sells lumber and fabricates furniture, cabinets and products from urban wood. Owner Paul Morrison authored the book, Tree to Table: Emergence of the Urban Wood Movement.”

Knotthead Custom Sawing and Fabworx of Ceres, CA, tied for third place in the Hydraulic Sawmill category. Many of the company’s projects involve milling a homeowner’s cherished tree into lumber and then crafting finished products from it. The Knotthead profile was written by Jennfer Alger, who spoke at the urban wood seminar presented at the 2016 International Woodworking Fair and who wrote a blog posted on the IL WUT website: Let’s Make Urban Wood a Household Name.

Read about all of the Business Best Contest winners.

 

 

 

THIRD PLACE TIE

BY JENN ALGER Today, about half of Knotthead’s

business is custom sawing and the other

half a mixture of the sale of slabs and

finished products including Adirondack

furniture, finished outdoor and indoor

tables, birdhouses, live edge rustic

outbuildings, and a whole lot more. Many

of their projects are a combination of

the custom sawing and finished products,

where they turn people’s trees into beautiful

finished products for them to treasure. “All

of the wood is reclaimed locally, cut

into lumber and slabs and sold back

to people in our community,” said

Charles. “People love to come buy wood

with a local story and keep the wood living

on as a nice project.”

FIRST PLACE MANUAL SAWMILLS

J & M Logging and Sawmill in the

southwest Missouri town of Fair

Grove has built his one-man business from

a startup company to a profitable and

successful operation.

 



ALOHA STATE’S GOT URBAN WOOD

Chicago, Milwaukee, Kansas City and Ann Arbor. There’s no need to think twice about any of those cities being bountiful sources of urban wood. But Kamuela, HI?

I find cause to pause.

Kamuela is on the Big Island of Hawaii and home to Kamuela Hardwoods. The company’s successful urban wood business is perhaps the most intriguing episode of Wood-Mizer’s Urban Sawmilling Series of videos.
Alex Woodbury, a woodworker, who co-founded the business with Josh Greenspan, an ISA certified arborist, says, “Up until recently, as much as 33% of our waste stream produced by our small island population of under 200,000 people was in the form of green waste, and in that green waste was an untold number of millable urban trees. For almost a decade we’ve been diverting some of that waste and producing beautiful sustainable lumber with it.”

Learn more and watch the video about this 49th-stage urban wood enterprise in this month’s Illinois Urban Wood Update.

If you are in a video watching mode, then check out the short presentation produced by Forest Proud that celebrates the omni importance of urban forests.

Also, in this month’s issue, read about Lumber Woman & Co., an urban wood business run by Tina Albright of Topeka, KS. It’s another story of homeowner who had a V8-moment about the potential of putting community trees to good use after researching what to do about a tree that needed to come down on her property.

Plus, the city of Greenfield, WI, represents a case study of how a community can take the initiative to repurpose tree removals into lumber and other wood products. The Greenfield Model is one of many inspirational stories shared by the Urban Wood Network.

Finally, speaking about the Urban Wood Network, learn how to become a member and the benefits that come with it. The initial paid membership drive has netted more than 35 founding members. For only $50 you can join these companies and entities and help shape plans to forward the urban wood movement.

Enjoy!

Rich Christianson
Communications Director
Illinois Wood Utilization Team
info@illinoisurbanwood.org

READ THE MARCH ILLINOIS URBAN WOOD UPDATE



Video: Urban Sawmilling in Hawaii

Episode V of Wood-Mizer’s Urban Sawmilling Series profiles Kamuela Hardwoods of Hawaii. The business was started a dozen years ago by Josh Greenspan, an ISA certified arborist, and Alex Woodbury, a sustainable building consultant and woodworker.

“Up until recently, as much as 33% of our waste stream produced by our small island population of under 200,000 people was in the form of green waste, and in that green waste was an untold number of millable urban trees,” Wooodbury said. “For almost a decade we’ve been diverting some of that waste and producing beautiful sustainable lumber with it.”

Binge watch the entire Urban Sawmilling Series.

Learn more about Kamuela Hardwoods.



Video: Dan Cassens on ‘Milling Your Own Lumber’

Popular Woodworking has teamed up with Wood-Mizer on a seven part series, “Milling Your Own Lumber.” One of the segments features an interview with Dan Cassens, a retired professor of wood products at Purdue University, the owner of a successful Christmas tree farm and owner of Cassens Lumber in West Lafayette, IN. Those you attended the 2015 Bringing the Urban Forest Full Circle Conference will recall his excellent presentations comparing and contrasting urban wood to commercial hardwood markets, as well as his sawmill demonstrations.



Retired Teacher Focuses on Growing Urban Wood Business

After retiring last spring from a distinguished teaching career that spanned 33 years, Steve Skorup has decided to dedicate more time to harvesting urban trees to make furniture and other wood products.

Skorup spent most of his teaching career at Waubonsie Valley High School where he taught technology and engineering education. Among his many honors, Skorup was named 2003 Illinois Drafting Educators Association Teacher of the Year, 2007 ITEA Teacher of the Year and twice chosen as SkillsUSA Advisor of the Year. He also coached wrestling for 24 years and was nominated IWCOA Assistant Wrestling Coach of the Year.

A resident of Sandwich, IL, Skorup operates SAWINC. It’s a company he launched while attending high school. His company specializes in harvesting trees to make wood products including live-edge tables, cutting boards and furniture.

“I have done woodworking since I was in high school in Lockport,” Skorup wrote in an email. “I have had my company SAWINC since high school when a friend and I formed a small cabinet making enterprise. My interest in urban wood utilization began about five years ago when Brandon Dobnick, a neighbor, began working for Morton Arboretum and was taking down trees on the side. He now has his own business, Dobnick Timberworks/Vertical Solutions. We started with one walnut tree and a table project he wanted to do and from there we started acquiring trees, doing some work while waiting for me to retire from teaching and dedicate more time to the business.

“We started with Brandon’s chain saw mill but also hired a Wade Ellis out of West Chicago who had a Wood-Mizer sawmill when we had a big pile we needed milled,” he continued. “We’ve acquired trees from some area tree services, towns, school districts, or we cut our own. I have been storing up slabs for four years and am looking forward to making some more products moving forward.”

Notable sources of logs have included the Morton Arboretum’s prairie restoration along the DuPage River, trees downed by a tornado in 2015 at the Woodhaven Lakes campground and a pair of American elms from the Frank Lloyd Wright home and studio in Oak Park. Skorup noted that the trees he salvaged from the tornado scene represented a mere handful of the number that were felled. “So many of the trees were just ground to mulch in the clean-up effort,” Skorup said.

“My Frank Lloyd Wright live edge table won a Blue Ribbon at the Sandwich Fair last year,” Skorup added. “I try and use all pieces of the tree – serving boards, Poppe blocks for my grandchildren, outdoor ash benches, etc.”

Skorup says he plans to build a website for his business. In the meantime, he can be contacted at sawinc.skorup@gmail.com.



IWF Urban Wood Seminar Delivered with a Tinge of Irony

As I went about last-minute preparations leading up to welcoming woodworkers to the August 24 urban wood seminar, I had to laugh.

Standing at the podium, I pulled a red and silver flash drive from my pocket containing all four of the panelist’s presentations. As I began inserting it into the laptop connected to the projector, I noted the device bore the logo “Allsteel,” The irony that I had uploaded our urban wood PowerPoints onto the thumb drive pf this metal office furniture manufacturer randomly fished from my collection did not escape me.

After briefly pausing to chuckle, I put on my game face and charged ahead with my opening remarks introductions of the expert panel representing three distinct urban wood utilization groups: Jennifer Alger, Urban Salvaged & Reclaimed Wood on the West Coast; Joe Lehnen, Virginia Urban Wood Group of the Southeast; and Dwayne Sperber, Urban Wood Network of the Midwest.

The 90-minute presentation was well received by the audience of professional woodworkers attending the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta. They came from coast to coast and Canada. Some had experience using urban wood in their products, others were curious to learn more about how they might do so. A few even expressed interest in trying to rev up urban wood networks in their home states where none currently existed.

The program had the support of lead sponsor Wood-Mizer, plus Richelieu Hardware, Dynabrade and Safety Speed Manufacturing. All four companies are long-time exhibitors of IWF, North America’s largest woodworking event.

Read more about the seminar, “The Urban Wood Revolution Is Now! Come Join the Movement,” in this month’s Illinois Urban Wood Update.

Also featured in this issue

Professional woodworkers are an important link in the chain to grow demand for urban wood. This is why being able to take to the stage of huge industry events like IWF, and benefit from all of the publicity that surrounds it, is an important component of the Urban Wood Network’s outreach activities to spur greater awareness of urban woods potential. Earlier this summer, the story of how Riverside, IL, repurposed an historic 160-year-old oak tree felled by high winds into custom desks for its trustees, was published in Woodshop News. The national publication is circulated to more than 50,000 print and digital readers.

Sam Sherrill, the dean of urban wood, helped examine the greener side of urban wood products. His research done in tandem with Steve of Dovetail Partners, quantified the benefits of furniture and other products made with urban wood to sequester carbon, thus reducing the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

Reminders
The second installment of the Urban Wood Network’s How To Do Urban Wood webinar series – Urban Lumber – How to Produce and Market It – takes place at 1 p.m. EST Wednesday, August 29.

The Wisconsin Urban Forest Fest is scheduled for September 15 at the Lynden Sculpture Garden in Milwaukee.

The lights are always on for receiving your urban wood stories, photos and experiences to share with the Illinois Urban Wood Update subscriber base.

Enjoy the issue!

Rich Christianson

Communications Director
Illinois Wood Utilization Team
info@illinoisurbanwood.org

P.S. Joe Lehnen texted me to let me know he had the “Allsteel” thumb drive, which I had left in the seminar room. I replied that he should hold onto it and that perhaps 10 years from now it would be a valuable collectable of the Urban Wood Movement!

READ THE AUGUST ILLINOIS URBAN WOOD UPDATE