Search Results for "illinoisurbanwood"

IllinoisUrbanWood’s Top 10 Countdown

By Rich Christianson

The eyes have it!

The final votes are in and the Top 10 most-viewed posts on IllinoisUrbanWood.org are known.

Activity on the Illinois Urban Wood Utilization Team’s website finished 2016 with 7, 349 visitors who clicked through 17,412 pages. Both of these totals are more than double that of 2015.

Here’s a quick reverse-order recap of the most popularly viewed posts last year.

10. Video: Tom The Sawyer Mills Black Walnut for Figure
Tom Hogard, aka Tom The Sawyer, of Eudora, KS, demonstrates how to maximize the figure of logs with “flaws” including sweep or crotches. Read more.

9. Woodworking Enthusiasts Get a Taste of Urban Wood
Woodworkers of all ages get an opportunity to craft products from wood salvaged from Chicago Park District trees. Read more.

8. Historic Bell Tolls for Urban Wood Display
Jeff Perkis used red oak milled from one of the downed trees to create a display stand for a historic train bell. It will become a permanent exhibit at the West Chicago City Museum. Read more.

7.  Illinois Sawmill Directories Updated
The Forestry Division of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources recently released a pair of newly updated sawmill directories, one featuring custom sawyers and the other dedicated to stationary sawmilling operations. Read more.

6. Passions Flow at IWF Urban Wood Seminar
Three presenters – representing three very diverse business models – chorused their praise for urban wood during a unique seminar held Aug. 26 at the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta. Read more.

5. Diverse Audience Unites at Urban Wood Event
Arborists, foresters, sawyers, architects, woodworkers and other professionals came together at the Bringing the Urban Wood Full Circle Conference to learn and share ideas for propelling the urban wood market. Read more.

4. Couple ‘Sacrificed Our Entire Lives’ for Urban Wood Business
Rob and Zoe Bocik left the 9-to-5 rat race six years ago to pursue their dream of milling lumber and crafting furniture, jewelry and other products from local trees otherwise destined for the chipper or landfill. Read more.

3. Arborist Pursues His Passion with Urban Wood Start-up
Dobnick Timberworks has joined the Illinois urban wood  movement, opening up a lumber and custom wood products business in Oswego, IL. Read more.

2. Urban Wood Products Showcase Winners Strut Their Stuff
The Urban Wood Products Showcase, featured at the March 2016 Bringing the Urban Forest Full Circle Conference, shined a bright spotlight on the design creativity of the entries that ranged from tables and wall hangings to a bell stand and soccer ball all crafted from urban wood. Read more.

1. First Release: Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide
A new national directory dedicated to helping connect tree care professionals, sawyers, woodworkers and other urban wood enthusiasts was recently released by the Urban Forest Full Circle Network. Read more.



How Harrisonburg, VA, Upscales Dead Ash Trees

Harrisonburg, VA, home to 54,000 people and the annual Gr8 Film Festival, is also serious about repurposing its ash trees victimized by the emerald ash borer.

Harrisonburg’s first EAB siting was in 2015. Since 2018, the city has removed more than 550 ash trees. More than 750 additional ash trees are scheduled for removal by the end of 2021. 

In 2018, Harrisonburg chemically treated 36 ash trees through the Virginia Department of Forestry’s Cost-Share Program in an attempt to preserve them. Thirty-two of those trees received a second treatment in 2020. The four untreated in the second round were damaged by storms. Plans call for reevaluating the remaining 32 trees for treatment again in 2022.

Unfortunately the city cannot afford to treat all of its ash trees. In the search for finding a higher use for the many that can’t be saved, the Harrisonburg’s public works department has partnered with the Virginia Urban Wood Group to use the wood when possible and, thus, keep it out of landfills.

Some of the wood is auctioned off through the city’s public surplus website. 

In one of the more creative displays of using reclaimed ash wood, two city staff members working with local company Willow Run Custom Lumber,  took an ash tree that was recently removed from Westover Park and transformed the lumber into a shadow box to present an American flag created out of a fire hose. It was a fitting send-off gift to retiring master firefighter BJ Clark.

 “As much as I was saddened to retire, I truly appreciate that a part of the city will remain with me,” Clark said. 

Added Jeremy Harold, Harrisonburg’s green space manager, “Anytime we can take a tree that was lost for unfortunate reasons, and give it a new purpose as opposed to it going to waste – that’s what the Harrisonburg Urban Wood Utilization Program is all about.” 

Learn more: Out of the Ashes | City of Harrisonburg, VA.

About that Super Gr8 film fest, here’s a video that will tickle the nostalgic funny bone of anyone who ever filmed or was filmed with a Super 8 camera.

 

 

 

 

 

 



Urban Tree Merchants Is Keeping Score

Urban Tree Merchants (UTM) of Arlington, TX, maintains a scoreboard of sorts on its website.

The statistics above – captured on Dec. 28 – reflect the current running tally of urban trees that the custom woodworking company has repurposed into slabs and lumber since it was established on Dec. 1, 2016 by Caleb and Kelly Geer.

Pecan accent wall

The Geers bill their business as a “tree to table” enterprise. The company specializes in the design and manufacture of custom wood furniture and decorative items including tables, shelves, mantels, benches, cutting boards, cake stands and lazy Susans.

UTM works with local tree care companies in the Dallas-Fort Worth corridor to repurpose removed trees. The company mills and dries its own lumber.

Caleb Geer’s was inspired to found UTM while working for Tree Shepherds, his father’s tree care company. Kelly Geer’s diverse background includes catering, coordinating programs for the City of Arlington, social media marketing and serving as operations manager for Tree Shepherds.

UTM is a member of the Arlington Chamber of Commerce and the Urban Wood Network.

Learn more at UrbanTreeMerchants.com.

River and waterfall countertop

 

 



American Hardwoods Focus of New Free Guide

A Guide to Sustainable American Hardwoods was recently issued by the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC). 

The publication combines AHEC’s guide to species and guide to lumber grades in to a single illustrated and comprehensive 102-page publication.

The front half of the guide provides a full break down of the properties, applications, and environmental credentials of commercially available U.S. hardwood species. The back half includes a simplified explanation of the NHLA grading system, which is the national standard for the U.S. hardwood lumber industry and forms the basis for export grading.

AHEC is an international trade association for the U.S. hardwood industry, representing U.S. hardwood exporters and major U.S. hardwood product trade associations. AHEC runs a worldwide program to promote the full range of American hardwoods in more than 50 export markets.

Download the Guide

 



Urban Tree Monitoring Video Series Part 1: Getting Started

Field monitoring of urban trees is essential to understanding how urban forests change over time. Part 1 of this 5-part animated series “Getting Started” is a broad overview to help viewers begin to undertake urban tree monitoring projects.

Watch other segments of the Urban Tree Monitoring series.

Part 2: Mortality Status
Part 3: Trunk Diameter

Part 4: Location Methods
Part 5: Managing Field Work

The series was produced by the U.S. Forest Service, which also offers two related publications:

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Field Guide
This report provides detailed protocols for urban tree monitoring data collection. Specifically, we discuss the core variables necessary for field-based monitoring projects, including field crew identification, field crew experience level, tree record identifier, location, site type, land use, species, mortality status, crown vigor, and trunk diameter. The intent of this Field Guide is to serve urban forest managers and researchers who collect longitudinal field data on urban trees, as well as interns and citizen scientists. DOWNLOAD THE FIELD GUIDE

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Resource Guide
This is a companion document to the Field Guide. DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCE GUIDE



Urban Tree Monitoring Video Series Part 2: Mortality Status

Field monitoring of urban trees is essential to understanding how urban forests change over time. Part 2 of this his 5-part animated series focuses on how to correctly categorize the mortality or survival status of each tree in a long-term monitoring study.

Part 1: Getting Started
Part 3: Trunk Diameter
Part 4: Location Methods
Part 5: Managing Field Work

The series was produced by the U.S. Forest Service, which also offers two related publications:

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Field Guide
This report provides detailed protocols for urban tree monitoring data collection. Specifically, we discuss the core variables necessary for field-based monitoring projects, including field crew identification, field crew experience level, tree record identifier, location, site type, land use, species, mortality status, crown vigor, and trunk diameter. The intent of this Field Guide is to serve urban forest managers and researchers who collect longitudinal field data on urban trees, as well as interns and citizen scientists. DOWNLOAD THE FIELD GUIDE

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Resource Guide
This is a companion document to the Field Guide. DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCE GUIDE



Urban Tree Monitoring Video Series Part 3: Trunk Diameter

Field monitoring of urban trees is essential to understanding how urban forests change over time. Part 3 of this 5-part animated series “Trunk Diameter” focuses on how to accurately measure the diameter at breast height (DBH) of a tree.

Watch other segments of the Urban Tree Monitoring series.

Part 1: Getting Started
Part 2: Mortality Status
Part 4: Location Methods
Part 5: Managing Field Work

The series was produced by the U.S. Forest Service, which also offers two related publications:

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Field Guide
This report provides detailed protocols for urban tree monitoring data collection. Specifically, we discuss the core variables necessary for field-based monitoring projects, including field crew identification, field crew experience level, tree record identifier, location, site type, land use, species, mortality status, crown vigor, and trunk diameter. The intent of this Field Guide is to serve urban forest managers and researchers who collect longitudinal field data on urban trees, as well as interns and citizen scientists. DOWNLOAD THE FIELD GUIDE

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Resource Guide
This is a companion document to the Field Guide. DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCE GUIDE

 



Urban Tree Monitoring Video Series Part 4: Location Methods

Field monitoring of urban trees is essential to understanding how urban forests change over time. Part 4 of this 5-part animated series “Location Methods,” focuses on how to accurately locate trees as part of an urban tree monitoring project.

Watch other segments of the Urban Tree Monitoring series.

Part 1: Getting Started
Part 2: Mortality Status
Part 3: Trunk Diameter
Part 5: Managing Field Work

The series was produced by the U.S. Forest Service, which also offers two related publications:

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Field Guide
This report provides detailed protocols for urban tree monitoring data collection. Specifically, we discuss the core variables necessary for field-based monitoring projects, including field crew identification, field crew experience level, tree record identifier, location, site type, land use, species, mortality status, crown vigor, and trunk diameter. The intent of this Field Guide is to serve urban forest managers and researchers who collect longitudinal field data on urban trees, as well as interns and citizen scientists. DOWNLOAD THE FIELD GUIDE

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Resource Guide
This is a companion document to the Field Guide. DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCE GUIDE

 



Urban Tree Monitoring Video Series Part 5: Managing Field Work

Field monitoring of urban trees is essential to understanding how urban forests change over time. Part 5 of this 5-part animated series “Managing Field Work,” discusses strategies for training and supervising filed crews carrying out monitoring projects, including both interns and citizen scientists.

Watch other segments of the Urban Tree Monitoring series.

Part 1: Getting Started
Part 2: Mortality Status
Part 3: Trunk Diameter
Part 4: Location Methods

The series was produced by the U.S. Forest Service, which also offers two related publications:

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Field Guide
This report provides detailed protocols for urban tree monitoring data collection. Specifically, we discuss the core variables necessary for field-based monitoring projects, including field crew identification, field crew experience level, tree record identifier, location, site type, land use, species, mortality status, crown vigor, and trunk diameter. The intent of this Field Guide is to serve urban forest managers and researchers who collect longitudinal field data on urban trees, as well as interns and citizen scientists. DOWNLOAD THE FIELD GUIDE

Urban Tree Monitoring: A Resource Guide
This is a companion document to the Field Guide. DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCE GUIDE

 

 



Iowa Derecho: So many trees lost, so little wood saved

A crew cleans up tree debris following the Aug. 10 derecho in Cedar Rapids, IA.

By Rich Christianson

The wicked Aug. 10 derecho that spawned tornadoes, high winds and torrential rains throughout the Midwest sent me to take cover in a basement for the second time in my life. One look at the fast-approaching gray green front was enough to convince me that the tornado alerts for the northwest side of Chicago were more than mere local news hype. I was instantly reminded of the 1967 tornadoes that struck Oak Lawn, IL, that caused my parents to shoo my siblings and me downstairs. That event claimed 58 lives.

Fortunately for us, the worst of the storm in my area were a few downed trees and many heavy branches. Many in Iowa were not so lucky.

According to the Washington Post, the Iowa derecho was the most costly thunderstorm in U.S. history. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimated damage in Iowa and other midwestern states at $7.6 billion. That’s higher than any recorded tornado and more than many hurricanes.

Cedar Rapids, IA, was particularly hard hit. Wind gusts of up to 140 mph plummeted the area. Electrical power was knocked out for nearly all 133,000 residents and more than 1,000 homes were rendered unlivable.

The derecho also wiped out about 20 percent of Iows’s crops and felled trees by the hundreds. 

Six weeks after the devastating event, the Des Moines Register reported that the city’s cleanup crews had transported 9,291 loads of tree debris to a huge metropolitan compost site.

Several other articles posted in the wake of the Iowa derecho reported how local woodworkers and artists were using wood from felled trees to make craft items, most of them being sold or auctioned to support relief efforts. But that’s a drop in the ocean considering the massive amount of wood that could potentially be repurposed. 

No doubt, the number one priority in this type of situation is clearing downed trees in the interests of public safety. But somewhere after the smoke clears, it would be optimal to have a plan for repurposing as many of these trees as practically possible. Doing so begins by integrating urban wood utilization into disaster planning. 

I think we’ll get there, but we’re clearly not there yet. We still have far to many metropolitan cities to integrate urban wood recovery into their urban forestry initiatives. But perhaps the Iowa derecho can serve as a wake-up call for municipalities to realize that even if they can’t plan what do to with trees after a natural disaster, that they can at least figure out what might be done to gain value from the sycamore tree removed from the Smith’s parkway.

Baby steps…