Search Results for "get featured"

How to Get Your Urban Wood Business Featured

Aspiring to inspire, that is one of the missions of Illinois Urban Wood.

For the last four years, this website has featured profiles of urban wood entrepreneurs across the country and Canada. Their profiles and urban wood projects also have been included in the monthly Illinois Urban Wood Update that is sent to nearly 1,000 subscribers.

Getting your business and projects featured is as easy as 1, 2, 3.

  1. Send me one to four photos of a project or projects to richc.illinoisurbanwood@gmail.com.
  2. Include a brief description of the project or projects. Even bullet points will suffice.
  3. Include a link to your website if you have one.

I hope to hear from you soon!

Rich Christianson
Editor
Illinois Urban Wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Story of Riverside’s Wind-Felled Oak Featured in Woodshop News

The tale of how a storm-damaged white oak in Riverside, IL, was salvaged from the landfill and converted into desks for village trustees was chronicled in Woodshop News, a national publication for professional woodworkers.

“The story demonstrates how a village forester/arborist, sawyer and woodworker worked together to put the more than 160-year-old tree to a higher use as custom furniture. Michael Collins, village forester of Riverside, credits the Illinois Wood Utilization Team for inspiring him to seek the support of elected officials to make the project happen.

A 16-foot log salvaged from the 80-foot tall tree was milled by Bull Valley Hardwood of Woodstock, IL. Paul Meyer of Woodstock Woodworks & Studio devoted some 450 hours to producing the trio of desks.

Click here to read the article.

 



Sculptures feature urban spalted maple

Nicholas Hamilton Holmes of Hamilton, ON, created a collection of sculptures using spalted maple and oxidized white oak reclaimed respectively from urban wood and barn wood beams.

The salvaged wood featured in the “This and That” collection includes knots and cracks, veins of fungus and irregular textures. 

Holmes, a designer and maker of custom wood furniture, has put a greater focus on sculpture making characterized by bent, shaped and moulded wood. In the case of “This and That,” Holmes creates a visual metaphor by pairing simple geometric forms that “interact and play” with each other.

The collection debuted at Art Élysées in Paris, France in October 2019.

Also, check out Holmes’ Black Arts collection.



Urban Wood Movement’s Growth Focus of IWF 2020 Seminar

Free presentation at North America’s largest woodworking event will highlight opportunities for woodworkers to leverage the unique local appeal and environmental benefits of using urban wood.
International Woodworking Fair

August 25-28, 2020

Seminar Organizer

Seminar Organizer

Sponsor

ATLANTA – The Urban Wood Network (UWN), in partnership with the International Woodworking Fair (IWF), will present a free seminar, “The Urban Wood Movement: Expanding from Coast to Coast.”

The 90-minute session is scheduled for 1 p.m. Wednesday, August 26. This represents the third consecutive edition of the biennial event to feature a seminar devoted to urban wood utilization. IWF, North America’s largest gathering of woodworking professionals and suppliers, runs August 25-28 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta.

“It’s amazing how far the urban wood movement has advanced since we held the first seminar at IWF 2016,” said Rich Christianson, editor and publisher of IllinoisUrbanWood.org, a website advocating the responsible reuse of felled community trees for lumber and wood products. “Since then, the Urban Wood Network has emerged as a rapidly expanding national association representing stakeholders up and down the entire supply chain including arborists, sawyers and custom woodworkers. We’re looking forward to sharing the latest information at IWF, including the creation of national standards and certification of urban wood lumber and products that will help drive market demand.”

“Lumber produced from urban wood can be utilized in a broad range of scales ranging from one-of-a-kind custom furniture pieces to large-scale construction projects,” said Don Peterson, executive director of the Urban Wood Network. “As detrimental as the wide sweeping urban tree mortality has been to communities, it has also made large volumes of urban wood available for conversion into lumber, providing enough resource for large scale projects.”

Christianson will moderate the session that will feature a trio of presenters, all representatives of companies belonging to the Urban Wood Network. They include:

  • Jennifer Alger, CEO of Far West Forest Products based in Sheridan, CA. Far West is a family-owned logging and sawmilling business that actively promotes the use of local native species and underutilized logs including reclaimed urban wood.
  • Carmen Rodriguez, chief marketing officer of Eutree based in Villa Rica, GA. Eutree is a boutique lumber mill that partners with Atlanta-area tree services repurpose trees as lumber, flooring, slabs and more.
  • Dwayne Sperber, owner of Wudeward Urban Forest Products based in Milwaukee, WI. Wudeward exclusively sources Wisconsin Urban Wood in working with architects, interior designers, builders, homeowners, developers, manufacturers and furniture makers nationwide.

The panel of experts will discuss urban wood’s unique local appeal, environmental advantages, finding local sources, business benefits and more. The presenters will also answer questions about urban wood utilization directed by individual audience members.

The Georgia Forestry Commission has signed on as the first sponsor of the IWF 2020 urban wood seminar.

For more information about the IWF urban wood seminar, including sponsorship opportunities, contact Rich Christianson at richc.illinoisurbanwood@gmail.com or phone 773-822-6750.

###

About the International About the International Woodworking Fair
The International Woodworking Fair, owned by the Woodworking Machinery Industry Association and the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America, is North America’s largest industrial woodworking event. IWF 2020 is scheduled for August 25-28 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. It is the “must-attend” show for manufacturers of furniture, cabinets, flooring and other secondary wood products. More than 30,000 visitors registered for IWF 2018, which featured displays of machinery and supplies from nearly 1,100 companies covering 1 million square feet of exhibit space. Learn more and register at iwfatlanta.com.

About the Urban Wood Network
The Urban Wood Network (UWN) is a national association established to inform, collaborate and connect to build business and consumer confidence in the urban wood industry. UWN’s membership includes municipalities, government agencies, arborists, saw mills, woodworkers and other stakeholders in the United States, plus Canada and other countries. Learn more about the UWN and membership benefits at urbanwoodnetwork.org.



Slideshow: Nebraska’s Ash Wood Showcase

 
The creative output of more than 20 woodworkers and artists was featured in the Ash Wood Showcase held last month at Turbine Flats in Lincoln, NE.
 
The event, part of Lincoln’s First Friday Artwalk, was facilitated by the Nebraska Forest Service. More than 200 people viewed the furniture and crafts, a sampling of which is displayed in the accompanying slideshow.
 
“The response was incredibly positive,” said Heather Norbert, forest products marketing coordinator for the Nebraska Forest Service. “During the event we also had our forest health staff there to answer questions about the emerald ash borer. They said they talked to more folks at this event than they typically do at agricultural events. The Lincoln Parks and Recreation Department was there as were representatives from a few local wood products businesses. All in all the event was quite successful.”

The ash wood used in the showcase was donated by the city of Lincoln, milled by the forest service and dried at Big Red Sawmill in Palmyra, NE.

The emerald ash borer’s migration to Lincoln threatens more than 50,000 private and public ash trees. 



Award-Winning Book Celebrates Chicago Tree Project

Chicago-area Sculptor Margot McMahon, whose works with urban wood were featured here in a January post, is also the author of “The Fifth Season: The Chicago Tree Project.” The book won first place in the annual state-wide Mate E. Palmer Professional Communications Contest. McMahon’s salute to public tree art qualifies for judging in the NFPW national contest.

The book showcases 50 dead trees sculpted by 30 renown artists – including the author – gracing dozens of Chicago Park District parks.

From McMahon’s website: “The first section of the book is an explanation of the importance of keeping condemned trees in urban nature. The second section is poetry of the vital life within a dying tree including feeding birds, creating burrows for animals and interactions with the grove of like trees. The third section is a service workshop to care for the park and parkway saplings.”

The book, published by Lambert Academic Publishing, is available on Amazon

McMahon was recognized by the Illinois Woman’s Press Association with the 2019 Mate E. Palmer First Place Public Service Award for her contributions to the Chicago Tree Project. Learn more at thechicagotreeproject.org.



Grinnell College’s felled walnut trees graduate into benches

  • Small walnut bench displayed during 2019 alumni weekend at Grinnell College.
(Note: Slide captions at end of post.)
 
By Kevin Field
 
A while back, I received a very intriguing email. Grinnell College of Grinnell, IA, – my alma mater – was planning a major expansion of one of its oldest instructional buildings, and several very large, black walnut trees stood within the new-construction footprint.
 
Chris Bair, the college’s environmental and safety coordinator, contacted me and several other alum woodworkers to solicit proposals for using the urban (campus) harvest to create commissioned benches for the new and newly renovated buildings. A full circle. How cool was that?!
 
Luckily, I was able to meet with Chris onsite – before the trees were felled – to advise on sectioning, milling and air drying.
 
Howard McDonough and Mick Goebel slabbed the 70- to 80-year-old trees. Two years later, I transported a number of air-dried, 2” x 24” x 8’ black walnut slabs from Iowa to my shop in Westmont, IL. I air-dried them to 7% moisture content (MC) in my dining room over the winter. (I had to kick the wife out first – proceed with caution.) In the spring, I constructed two commissioned benches I designed for the college to display within the new building.
 
The ball-shaped defect in the close-up photo of the back rail of the longer of the two benches is a lead bullet! I found a number of bullets embedded in the tree, and was able to incorporate a visible example into the bench design under a clear epoxy filler. The presence of the bullets is an intriguing mystery as the walnut trees were located right in the middle of campus – not a location where guns would be expected to be fired.
 
Having strolled in the shade of those very walnut trees on my way to many a lecture class over the four years I attended Grinnell, it gives me great pleasure to know that the legacy of those majestic trees has been conserved and transformed into heirloom pieces of beautiful furniture that Grinnell students can continue to use and admire into the future. 
 
Kevin Field is owner of Field Joinery & Design Studio of Westmont, IL. Learn more at customwoodwerker.com.
 
Slide Captions
Slide 1: Shorter walnut bench on display in campus gallery during Grinnell College’s 2019 Alumni Reunion Weekend.

Slide 2: Wind motif flows into the natural grain pattern in back-rest panels.

Slide 3: One of the Grinnell College walnut logs is milled into lumber.

Slide 4: Walnut trees 1, 3, & 4 in the plan view were the source of the lumber used for the benches.

Slide 5: Some of Grinnell College’s walnut trees prior to removal.

Slide 6: Lead bullets shown in the position they were found encased in the walnut lumber, including two wedged against each other. They were incorporated into bench back-rail – visible under clear epoxy.

Slide 7: Carving book-matched back-rest panels achieved using rotary tool with burrs and reciprocating chisel handset.
 
Editor’s Note: We’re always on the prowl for interesting tales of urban wood use. Learn how to get your business featured.
 


Wudeward’s Owner Shares Vision & Passion for Urban Wood in Podcast

Dwayne Sperber, owner of Wudeward Urban Forest Products of Milwaukee, WI, was the featured guest of a recent Woodpreneur podcast, produced by Acre of Timbers.

Sperber is well known on the urban wood scene for his passionate involvement with Wisconsin Urban Wood and the Urban Wood Network. Wudeward is a business focused on supplying Wisconsin Urban Wood to architects, designs, builders and wood product manufacturers. 

Among many other things, Sperber presents his views of the current state of the urban wood movement, tips for developing a local urban wood network and how adopting industry standards – which are in the works – will help propel market demand for urban wood in the future.

Listen or watch the podcast.



Texas Urban Wood Firm Focuses on ‘Tree to Home’

Refined Elements, of Dripping Springs, TX, near Austin, along with its subsidiary Texas Sawmill, is engaged in transforming trees salvaged from Texas and nearby states into “naturally inspired furniture” and other custom wood products.

Devin Ginther, president, founded Refined Elements in 2013 , as a live edge furniture business. He said he stated Texas Sawmill in late 2017. “We are working to become the largest urban sawmill in Texas,” Ginther said. He hastened to add. “(That’s) not saying much as there’s not much of a sawmill industry here.”

Ginther said he is an “active member” of the Urban Wood Network “We are focused on being advocates for the urban lumber movement in Texas. As a state, we are far behind (others) but are working to change that!”  

The photos that accompany this post are but two examples of live edge tables milled by Texas Sawmill and transformed into furniture by Refined Elements. 

“All of our tables are produced from salvaged and rural trees,” Ginther said. “We also provide the history of the trees on the bottom of all of our tables along with paper certificates. Most of the slabs used to produce these tables, we physically salvage ourselves, mill, dry, etc.  We do all the metal and base work in-house, too. 

The first live edge table in the slide show is made from a black walnut that was removed in Longmont, CO. It is believed to date back to 1867.

The other live edge table shown is from a Texas pecan born in approximately 1904 in Brackettville, TX.  

Learn more at refinedelements.com and txurbansawmill.com.

Get your business or project profiled.



Madison, WI: A Progressive Urban Wood City

Editor’s note: Madison, WI, has been a leader among U.S. municipalities in salvaging urban trees from the waste stream. The following information is featured on the Urban Wood Network’s website as a shining example of how a city can play a leadership role in the urban wood movement.

The City of Madison Parks Model (MP) works as a cost neutral trade between Madison Parks (Parks) and WUW partners. Parks provides the logs and WUW sawyers produce lumber for park benches, maintenance materials, and over time, finished conference tables. “Knowing the trees will live on makes us feel a lot better about having to take them down,” says Charlie Romines, Asst. Superintendent for Parks Operations “[C]utting the trees to preserve the log actually reduces fatigue and boosts morale for our crews.” The remainder of the wood from Park’s trees is kiln dried and available through local businesses. Many of the first logs removed under the MP quickly found a home in a local development featuring ash countertops.

The adaptive reuse of urban wood allows us to be sure that EAB won’t have the last word when it comes to our ash trees. We think Madison residents will share our appreciation for this silver lining to the loss of our ash trees and other park trees,” says Eric Knepp, Parks Superintendent. The success of this arrangement ultimately lies in the hands of local residents. When residents buy local wood, they reduce transportation emissions, reduce waste, and make it possible for local businesses to stay involved in salvaging the wood from these trees.

A sample of the WUW-Madison Parks Proposal can be found here.