Search Results for "eco urban timber"

eco Urban Timber Turns Dead Ash into Cash

Eco-Urban-Timber-Light-BoxEntrepreneurial woodworking artisan Julie McFadden launched eco Urban Timber LLC last year upon realizing the potential of salvaging high-value wood from the city of Eau Claire’s urban forests traumatic battle with the deadly emerald ash borer.

McFadden’s entre into the urban wood products business was recently chronicled by VolumeOne, news from Wisconsin’s Chippewa Valley.

“Ash is such a beautiful wood, and the maples and some of the other woods that are in the urban setting make really interesting furniture,” McFadden told VolumeOne.

eco Urban Timber participates in the Chippewa Valley Urban Wood Project launched in 2014 as part of a collation of Leadership Eau Claire, the Wisconsin DNR and the city of Eau Claire’s efforts to encourage more recycling of dead urban trees, especially those we are anticipating being killed by the emerald ash borer. The project involves many local businesses that have joined together to provide a wide selection of sustainable wood products.

eco Urban Timber sells its products on etsy. They include the Tree of Life Shadow Box, Yoga Cat Tablet Stand, Eau Claire Beer Caddy and Minnesota Wine Rack.

eco Urban Timber is a member of Wisconsin Urban Wood, which is one of three grant partners with the Illinois Wood Utilization Team. The others are in Michigan and Missouri.



Pilot Program in Rome Uses Urban Wood to Curb Kids’ Digital Addiction

By Franco Paolinelli
Silvicultura Agrocultura Paesaggio, Rome, Italy

A school asked the Silvicultura Agrocultura Paesaggio (SAP) (Forestry Agriculture Landscape) association to conduct three laboratory activities for the manipulation of the “Wood of the Trees of Rome,” with primary school students during the 2019-2020 school year.

Project assumptions:

  • To a greater or lesser extent, children 6 to 10 years of age have ready access to electronic devices including computers, video gaming devices, smart phones, etc. They spend much of their free time with these digital tools playing games individually or in digital communication with other players. In many cases these activities are becoming the “focus” of their recreational and social life. Moreover, these kids, in their homes, have plenty of toys, but have limited opportunities for free manipulation and discovery of their potential manual abilities.
  • Consequently, a sort of “digital addiction” is going to afflict millions of kids in developed nations.
  • Having mainly adults with great skills in the virtual world but poor skills in the real world is risky for these communities.
  • Therefore, providing children opportunities to develop manual and creative abilities assumes social and cultural relevance.
  • Workshops may help to open kids’ minds to manual skills acquisition to be, eventually, added to digital ones.
  • Schools can contribute to this perspective, also considering that, as claimed by eminent pedagogical scholars, doing with the hands is an excellent way to “incorporate” knowledge. In fact, all manual activities can offer learning opportunities, in different disciplines.
  • Urban trees and forests may provide huge amounts of wood, in their original form of branch or trunk segments, and other materials such as pine cones and other fruit, berries, leaves … suitable to carry out manual manipulation activities.
  • Furthermore, using these materials leads to positive environmental and economic collateral effects: reduction of materials to be sent to landfills, creation of carbon stocks, jobs, etc.
  • On these assumptions, shared by the school, the described project was born: Rome trees’ wood workshop.

Participants:

1st group: 10 children of both sexes considered “hyperactive,” from various classes;

2nd group: 1 class of the 2nd year, about 20 children of both sexes; and

3rd group: 1 class of the 2nd year, about 20 children of both sexes.

Activities:

  • Handling segments and sections of branches of various shapes and sizes, weighing never more than 400g (14 ounces);
  • Transformation with manual tools such as saw, rasp, gimlet, chisel, cutter with blade length of 1 cm, clamps, wheel brace hand drill.
  • The activity has so far been directed towards the creation of collective objects.
  • Before Christmas: Creation of a Christmas tree with segments and branch sections.
  • In progress: Creation of a train with branch segments 20cm long and 4cm diameter on average.

Origin of the materials
Branches of various sizes coming from urban trees’ pruning and removal. Often, in Rome, companies doing maintenance contracts for public green areas leave debris at the base of the pruned trees for many days. So, up to now, it wasn’t difficult to collect branches and produce laboratory segments.

We added these with segments of boards produced with a chainsaw frame and a small portable sawmill, both available in SAP’s synergy network.

Conducting the workshops
At least three teachers were always involved, but, so far, observers came as well, bringing to a minimum of four adults present each time.

The basic training of these teachers is different, ranging from architecture, agricultural and forestry studies, to artisan experience. The common focus is the willingness to follow the kids in their discovery, each with his own pace and possibility.

Purpose of the activity:

  • Stimulate children to discover their manual skills;
  • Stimulate command / action coordination;
  • Reduce physical world fear;
  • Stimulate group work;
  • Convey to the school community messages, on the importance of trees, including their role in counteracting the greenhouse effect and the possible future development of an “urban timber” economy.

Current results of the project
In educational terms, in line with previous similar experiences, with kindergarten children and scout groups, the activity seems to arouse kids’ enthusiasm. They are fully involved and each tool; each new piece of wood is a discovery. Actual results are encouraging.

The use of wood done so far allows us to estimate that at the end of the course at least 1.5 quintals) (about 150 pounds) of wood will have been given a symbolic value, then removed from the landfill destiny.

We can only begin to guess how many quintals of urban wood could be salvaged on a city scale.



At-risk Youth Learn About Urban Wood

Editor’s note: The following article was written by Lekas & Levine Public Relations.

That buzzing sound recently heard throughout Allendale’s Lake Villa campus was the sound of transformation at work.

Literally, it was a large hydraulic sawmill cutting fallen trees into slabs, the first step to turning those dying white oaks into timeless handcrafted furniture.

In a deeper sense, it echoed Allendale Association’s mission of helping youth who have experienced various forms of trauma and adversity find their strength and capacity, transforming over time into healthy, independent adults.

The new, repurposed wood program is a collaboration between Allendale — a not-for-profit facility for kids with serious emotional, mental and behavioral challenges — and Jeff Clark, owner of Old School Timber Works Company in Libertyville. Clark is passionate about repurposing Illinois’ urban hardwood, as well as teaching life skills to at-risk youth.

Woodworking has long been a part of Allendale’s Career and Technical Education Program, which helps students develop vocational skills. Its wood shop instructor, Rob Serdar, a third-generation carpenter, was seeking ways to develop the program when the opportunity arose.

“Our hope is to expand our students’ imaginations and capabilities,” Serdar said, “while providing locally-sourced, high-quality wood pieces that will bring exposure to Allendale and give students a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

In addition, Clark — whose company provides on-site milling services, sells repurposed lumber and creates custom wood pieces — believes students will benefit from a better understanding of responsibly sourcing their lumber.

The process is known as Tree to Table; i.e., repurposing fallen lumber into furniture and goods rather than dumping and chipping it.

“Over a billion board feet of quality urban hardwood is wasted every year in the U.S.,” Clark said.

“These kids were part of a sustainable process in which they created beautiful, white oak lumber, saving and repurposing a worthy asset. Maybe that’s a life lesson that goes beyond milling lumber.”

One day in December, Clark brought his sawmill to Allendale’s 120-acre, wooded campus. He cut several downed white oaks into slabs, while the wood shop students cleaned, transported and stacked the slabs in preparation for the next step: curing them in Allendale’s new kiln.

The kiln, a large space filled with fans and dehumidifiers that dry out the wood, was funded through a grant provided by the Grace Bersted Foundation, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee. The grant also provided for initial supplies needed to get the program running.

Days after the event, students were still talking about it and itching to get their hands on the wood. Since then, they’ve used it to make several pieces of furniture and decorative home signs. Clark is slated to share tips and techniques in upcoming classes.

As the students’ skills advance, Serdar said, they’ll start building more elaborate tables, shelving and benches, as well as cutting boards, Charcuturie platters and decorative wood signs.

Some of the benches will be placed around campus and donated to the village of Lake Villa. In addition, creations will be sold at Allendale’s community craft and floral sales, perhaps as early as spring.

The proceeds will not only fund the purchase of ongoing supplies, but benefit the students’ vocational stipends. Meanwhile, as salvaged wood products become increasingly popular, the kids are gaining the skills to secure a place in this growing field, along with an appreciation for the environment and a lifelong passion that will serve them well.



Urban Wood Use Gets Thumbs Up in the Land Down Under

Editor’s note: We’re constantly on the look out for good stories about urban wood advocation no matter where they emanate. Our goal is to show that the urban wood movement is alive and well not only all over North America but beyond.

Such is the case about the following article authored by a trio of faculty at Australian National University. 

 

When a tree dies, don’t waste your breath. Rescue the wood to honour its memory

Turning a street tree into timber is much more respectful and useful than mulching it all.
Author provided

Cris Brack, Australian National University; Ashley Jameson Eriksmoen, Australian National University, and Rod Lamberts, Australian National University

Trees die. You don’t have to like it, but they do. And this comes as a surprise to some. A senior public servant once told one of us (Brack): “Trees don’t die; people kill them.”

Of course sometimes we kill trees, especially in urban areas where trees are regularly removed for reasons of safety or urban development.




Read more:
Our cities need more trees, but that means being prepared to cut some down


But more concerning than the death of a tree is how we waste them afterwards. In municipalities around the world, the trees are chipped into mulch. Not just the leaves and skinny branches and bark, but the whole tree.

It’s the least valuable, indeed least respectful, thing you can do with a tree.

 

Turning a whole tree into woodchips for mulch is the least valuable and least respectful thing you can do to it.
Author provided

In contrast, the wood can be rescued and used to craft furniture and other unique objects that honour the trees and their legacy of timber.

For those more poetically inclined, trees are literally made of our breath. By chipping them, we are wasting the breath of our past and making it harder to breathe in the future.




Read more:
Trees are made of human breath


Chipping trees means releasing carbon to the atmosphere as the mulch breaks down. It’s also a waste of high-quality timbers such as oak, ash, elm and cedar, which, ironically, Australia imports by the shipload.

When made into furniture, for example, the tree is transformed, the carbon stays bound and we have something both functional and beautiful.

 

Katalin Sallai’s Witness Tree Bench of Kingston (2016), 600 x 450 x 2000mm, Cedrus deodara (Himalayan cedar) from Kingston, mild steel.
Photo by Martin Ollman, Author provided

Urban forests can keep on giving

Salvaging quality timber is such an obvious win-win, you’d think everyone would do it. Sadly, there are many obstacles, including the difficulties of coordinating multiple public and private stakeholders and agencies.

To better understand the challenges and opportunities for urban timber rescue in Australia, we hosted a symposium at Australian National University in September 2019. Forestry researchers, public officials, craftspeople, teachers, students, conservation activists and city parks employees attended. They identified key values and concerns critical to reclaiming and distributing urban timber.

The symposium included a demonstration of how a portable (Lucas) mill could be quickly set up near a tree to cut it into useful timber. Operators can minimise waste by using bespoke cutting patterns to get the most valuable timber from each tree.

 

Street trees can provide valuable hardwood timber that, unlike woodchips, doesn’t release their stored carbon.
Author provided

 

Wood from a street tree is sawn and dried before the timber is given new life as a piece of fine furniture or other useful object.
Author provided

Participants from California described the Sacramento Tree Foundation’s Urban Wood Rescue program. Arborists, residents and the city work together to intercept logs from the waste stream. The timber is then made available to the public.

This program benefits from public trust that stems from decades of active tree planting across the city and genuine concern for the health of the urban forest. Recognising that the recovered wood is too good to waste is a natural extension of residents’ respect for their living trees.

Craftspeople and teachers from Canberra and other Australian cities discussed how providing quality timber to school students supports their love of making and develops their skills. One participant spoke of high school students being thrilled to work with such beautiful timber. They normally make do with cheap construction pine or broken-down pallets.

Rescuing and transforming the timber can bring people together to teach, learn and create. The object then captures not just carbon but a sense of the history of the tree and the place where it lived.

This is what the Witness Tree Project in Canberra, spearheaded by Eriksmoen, set out to do. Wood was rescued from just six of hundreds of trees scheduled for removal. The timber was distributed to six local woodworking artisans and furniture makers.

Their task was to creatively reconstruct a narrative of each tree and its neighbourhood. They transformed the trees into unique objects that delivered anecdotes and collective memories of local history and culture, culminating in a public exhibition.

 

The bench references the dimensions of the Himalayan cedar used for its timber.
Photo by Martin Ollman, Author provided

Katalin Sallai created the Witness Tree Bench of Kingston from a Himalayan cedar. The circular planter, containing a sapling of the same species, is the diameter of this tree when it was felled in 2013. The unfurling spiral arc of the bench seat describes the potential diameter of Himalayan cedar in ideal natural conditions.

Many references to Kingston, one of Canberra’s oldest suburbs, are embedded and engraved in the surface, including coins commemorating the queen’s 1954 visit. The bench is both an educational tool, describing the differences between a city tree and a rural tree, and a celebration of its own tree’s life and provenance as a witness to local history.




Read more:
Loving emails show there’s more to trees than ecosystem services


The recent symposium was also told of the positive effects of having living trees in our surroundings, including improved mental health, reductions in crime and better air quality. But this isn’t lost when the trees die. Recent research has shown wooden furniture and fittings in offices or homes can benefit mental health and reduce stress and sick days.

Seeing urban trees given a second life can also help ease eco-anxiety. Every tree removal can add to the sense of helplessness, but putting those trees to good use may create feelings of empowerment.

Four steps you can take

So don’t despair or whine when a tree is removed. Instead, make sure the wood isn’t squandered. Otherwise you are wasting your breath – twice!

Here’s what you can do:

  • raise awareness: tell people trees do die naturally, and city trees have shorter lives than their rural kin

  • demand action: tell your local representative that community trees are squandered on woodchips

  • buy local: buy products made from locally salvaged wood, not imported timber

  • get radical: if you’re the protesting type, chain yourself to a log to stop it being chipped.




Read more:
Where the old things are: Australia’s most ancient trees


The Conversation


Cris Brack, Associate Professor, Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University; Ashley Jameson Eriksmoen, Senior Lecturer, School of Art & Design, Australian National University, and Rod Lamberts, Deputy Director, Australian National Centre for Public Awareness of Science, Australian National University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.



Green America Honors GA Urban Wood Business

Eutree, an urban lumber business based in Villa Rica, GA, was one of two green businesses to receive the fall People & Planet Award from Green America.

Eutree is a sawmill and lumber supplier established in 2010 to divert what would otherwise be urban tree waste into flooring and other wood products. The company plans to use the $5,000 award to install log collections containers at tree service locations so that it can more efficiently collect them to convert into lumber.

According to EU’s website, the company’s founder Sims Acuff, an arborist in Atlanta, “got tired of throwing away logs… It’s so important that we stop neglecting the treasure of old-growth trees around us and begin utilizing the timber that is being remove from the people’s yard.”

The other fall award winner is Nature’s Magic, a woman-owned business in Athens, GA, that produces plant-based, non-toxic cleaners.

Green America is a non-profit whose “mission is to harness economic power – the strength of consumers, investors, businesses and the marketplace – to create a socially just and environmentally sustainable society. .



Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide

The Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide is intended to provide starting points for land managers, arborists, sawyers, woodworkers and other stakeholders to join or create urban wood networks. This guide includes local, state and national urban wood utilization groups; state sawmill directories and selected reports, case studies and other publications.

The Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide is a work-in progress and as such is subject to change without notice. This guide will be periodically updated. For listing consideration, contact info@illinoisurbanwood.org.

NATIONAL & REGIONAL RESOURCES

Ash Utilization Options Project

Dovetail Partners Reuse

Emerald Ash Borer Info

International Society of Arboriculture

Reuse Wood

Southeastern Urban Wood Exchange

Sustainable Urban Forestry Coalition

Tree Care Industry Association

U.S. Forest Service Urban & Community Forestry

U.S. Forest Service Wood Education & Resource Center

Urban Salvaged & Reclaimed Woods

Urban Wood Network

Urban Wood Network LinkedIn

Wood Education & Resource Center, Northeastern State & Private Forestry

Wood-Mizer Pro Sawyer Network

STATE & MUNICIPAL RESOURCES”]TOGGLE STATE & MUNICIPAL RESOURCES CONTENT

Arkansas Sawmill Directory

California Urban Forests Council

Colorado CoWood

Colorado Tree Coalition

Connecticut Urban Wood Utilization

Georgia Arborist Association Urban Wood Reutilization

Georgia Wood-Using Industries Directory (See page 102 for urban wood listings)

Illinois Custom Sawmill Directory

Illinois Wood Utilization Team

Indiana: ElkhartWood

Indiana Sawmill Directory

Iowa: Davenport Urban Wood Utilization

Iowa Directory of Sawmills

Kansas Sawmill Directory

Kentucky Forest Product Industry Directory

Maine Stationary & Portable Sawmill Directory

Maryland: Baltimore Urban Wood Project

Maryland: Baltimore Camp Small Zero Waste Initiative

Michigan Forest Products Industry Directory michigan.gov/wood

Michigan: Southeast Michigan’s Reclaimed Wood Marketplace

Michigan Urban Wood Network

Minnesota Primary & Secondary Forest Products Directories

Minnesota Forest Utilization and Marketing Program

Missouri Sawmill Directory

Montana DNRC Wood Directory

Nebraska Sawmill Directory

New Jersey Sawmill Directory

North Carolina Urban Forest Council

North Dakota Sawmill Directory

Ohio Sawmill Directory

Ohio Wood Products Directory

Oklahoma Sawmill Directory

Oregon: Clackamas Urban Lumber Program

Oregon Forest Industry Directory

South Carolina Forest Mill Directory

South Dakota Log Finder

Vermont Urban Wood & Community

Virginia Urban Wood Group

Washington: Eastern Washington Small-Scale Sawmill Directory

Washington: Western Washington Small-Scale Sawmill Directory

West Virginia Forest Products Directory

Wisconsin Urban Wood wisconsinurbanwood.org

Wisconsin Urban Wood Use Options Directory

CANADA

Ontario: Your Leaf Toronto

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Assessment of Urban Tree Utilization & Forestry Programs of Richmond, VA, and Raleigh, NC

Case Study: i2i Design, Wood Dale, IL

Case Study: Riverside, IL Transforms Windswept Oak into Fine Furniture

Estimates of Carbon Dioxide Withheld from the Atmosphere by Urban Hardwood Products

Manufacturing and Marketing Eastern Hardwood Lumber Produced by Thin Kerf Band Mills

Marketing Urban Wood for Higher Uses in Illinois: Resources for Arborists and Managers

Recycling Municipal Trees: A Guide for Marketing Sawlogs from Street Tree Removals in Municipalities

Tree to Table: The Wood Cycle Story

Utilizing Municipal Trees: Ideas from Across the Country

Urban Forests & Urban Tree Use

Urban Wood & Traditional Wood: A Comparison of Properties & Uses

Using Urban Wood Clusters to Build an Urban Wood Utilization Network

Wood Utilization Options for Urban Trees Infested by Invasive Species



‘Underappreciated’ Urban Wood Focus of Pennsylvania Workshop

King-of-Prussia-Urban-Wood-Workshop“Urban Wood: An Underappreciated Resource” is the title of a one-day workshop scheduled for Nov. 14 at Heuser Park in King of Prussia, PA. The event is being organized by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.

The workshop is intended to bring together suppliers, processors, and end users of urban wood who recognize the value of the resource and wish to make better use of the material. The workshop serves as a first step toward developing an urban wood network in southeast Pennsylvania to link potential partners. An advisory committee will be formed as a result of the initial meeting, and will help guide the DCNR Bureau of Forestry in moving the process forward.

Topics include:

  • Urban wood networks elsewhere in the country 
  • Properties of various wood species 
  • Bucking for optimum use 
  • Portable mill demonstration 
  • Dry kiln construction and operation demonstration  
  • Biochar-making demonstration 
  • Cross laminated timbers  
  • Local urban wood users

The targeted audience includes arborists, tree services, municipal public works offices, portable and stationary sawmill owners, dry kiln operators, craftspeople, artists, architects, and educators.

The registration fee is $20.

Click here to learn more.



Wisconsin Urban Wood Signs on as Wisconsin DNR Green Tier Charter

Secretary's Director JD Smith, left, and State Forester Fred Souba Jr., right, celebrate the signing of a Green Tier charter with Wisconsin Urban Wood's Executive Director Twink Jan-McMahon (Photo Credit: Wisconsin DNR)

Secretary’s Director JD Smith, left, and State Forester Fred Souba Jr., right, celebrate the signing of a Green Tier charter with Wisconsin Urban Wood’s Executive Director Twink Jan-McMahon
(Photo Credit: Wisconsin DNR)

MADISON, WI – Improving urban forest management practices took a step forward Friday with the signing of a Green Tier charter by Wisconsin Urban Wood and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Urban Wood is a network of independent businesses and nonprofit organizations that promotes the utilization of urban wood. As a network, WUW is instrumental in working to keep urban ash trees from simply being chipped to minimize the spread of emerald ash borer. The group also works to connect the supply of the wood to those who can turn the logs into a valuable commodity. In addition, WUW promotes the societal environmental and economic value of urban wood to communities and property owners across Wisconsin.

“We are glad to be partnering with Wisconsin Urban Wood in its mission to help turn quality timber cut from urban trees into usable lumber, furniture, flooring and other valuable wood products,” said DNR’s Secretary Cathy Stepp.

The celebration, held today at Prima II Apartments in Fitchburg, culminated with the signing of an environmental results Charter by Wisconsin Urban Wood’s Executive Director Twink Jan-McMahon and DNR Secretary’s Director JD Smith. Those in attendance included WUW partners, arborists, representatives from the WI Urban Forestry Council, city of Madison, DNR Forestry staff and Avante Properties, who have incorporated urban wood in their apartment designs.

The WUW Charter provides value to Wisconsin by:

  • supporting WUW to serve as a champion for urban wood and act as a connection between the traditional and urban wood industries, municipalities, counties and end users;
  • filling critical roles on committees and advisory teams;
  • collaborating on initiatives to seek and address current or emerging issues affecting urban wood utilization in Wisconsin and to provide training when needed; and
  • providing urban forest owners with a network of arborists who are practicing sound business management practices by following WUW governing documents and DNR’s best management practices, and guidelines,

“WUW is pleased to serve as an urban wood champion for the DNR,” said WUW’s Jan-McMahon. “We look forward to building on our mutual efforts to promote urban wood utilization across the state for the sake of Wisconsin urban forests and their communities.”

More details about Wisconsin Urban Wood and Green Tier can be found the on the DNR’s Green Tier website. Green Tier is a voluntary program administered by the DNR. Under this program, DNR works with entities who conduct their business with beyond compliance efforts and continually look for ways to improve. Currently there are 82 participants with 248 facilities in the program along with six Green Tier Charters.

Check out the Wisconsin Urban Woods Green Tiers Charter.



Urban Wood Utilization Webcast Set for April 11

Prof. Dan Cassens conducts a sawmill demo.

Prof. Dan Cassens conducts a sawmill demo.

The agenda for the biannual Urban Wood Webcast has been set. The webcast, which will feature updates of urban wood activities in the Midwest and other parts of the country, is scheduled for 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. (EST) Tuesday, April 11.

The webcast is presented by the Wood Education and Resource Center, a service of the Northeastern Area State & Private Forestry of the U.S. Forest Service.

 

ATTEND THE WEBCAST

Urban Wood Utilization Webcast Agenda

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Eastern

Focus: Recent urban wood utilization activities.

1:00 pm – Introduction and Overview
— Ed Cesa, US Forest Service, Wood Education and Resource Center

1:10 p.m. – Introducing Urban Wood To Design Professionals and Update on the Four State Bringing Urban Forestry Full Circle Project
— 
Dwayne Sperber, Wudeward Urban Forest Products

     Full Circle Project state updates:

– IL Update, Richard Christianson

– MI Update, Jessica Simons

– MO Update, Russell Hinnah

– WI Update, Sabina Dhungana

1:55 pm – DC Urban Wood Utilization Efforts

– Brian LeCouteur, DC Council of Governments

2:10 pm – Street Trees as a Source of Urban Timber in Washington, DC

– Alex Grieve, Graduate Student, Virginia Tech

2:40 pm – Firewood Processing Productivity Study Update and Upcoming Workshop 

– Harry Watt, North Carolina State University Wood Products Extension 

2:50 pm – VA Urban Wood Group Update

– Joe Lehnen, Virginia Department of Forestry

3:00 pm – Final comments and date for next webcast  

Next Webcast: 1:00 pm Eastern, Tuesday, October 10, 2017



IllinoisUrbanWood’s Top 10 Countdown

By Rich Christianson

The eyes have it!

The final votes are in and the Top 10 most-viewed posts on IllinoisUrbanWood.org are known.

Activity on the Illinois Urban Wood Utilization Team’s website finished 2016 with 7, 349 visitors who clicked through 17,412 pages. Both of these totals are more than double that of 2015.

Here’s a quick reverse-order recap of the most popularly viewed posts last year.

10. Video: Tom The Sawyer Mills Black Walnut for Figure
Tom Hogard, aka Tom The Sawyer, of Eudora, KS, demonstrates how to maximize the figure of logs with “flaws” including sweep or crotches. Read more.

9. Woodworking Enthusiasts Get a Taste of Urban Wood
Woodworkers of all ages get an opportunity to craft products from wood salvaged from Chicago Park District trees. Read more.

8. Historic Bell Tolls for Urban Wood Display
Jeff Perkis used red oak milled from one of the downed trees to create a display stand for a historic train bell. It will become a permanent exhibit at the West Chicago City Museum. Read more.

7.  Illinois Sawmill Directories Updated
The Forestry Division of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources recently released a pair of newly updated sawmill directories, one featuring custom sawyers and the other dedicated to stationary sawmilling operations. Read more.

6. Passions Flow at IWF Urban Wood Seminar
Three presenters – representing three very diverse business models – chorused their praise for urban wood during a unique seminar held Aug. 26 at the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta. Read more.

5. Diverse Audience Unites at Urban Wood Event
Arborists, foresters, sawyers, architects, woodworkers and other professionals came together at the Bringing the Urban Wood Full Circle Conference to learn and share ideas for propelling the urban wood market. Read more.

4. Couple ‘Sacrificed Our Entire Lives’ for Urban Wood Business
Rob and Zoe Bocik left the 9-to-5 rat race six years ago to pursue their dream of milling lumber and crafting furniture, jewelry and other products from local trees otherwise destined for the chipper or landfill. Read more.

3. Arborist Pursues His Passion with Urban Wood Start-up
Dobnick Timberworks has joined the Illinois urban wood  movement, opening up a lumber and custom wood products business in Oswego, IL. Read more.

2. Urban Wood Products Showcase Winners Strut Their Stuff
The Urban Wood Products Showcase, featured at the March 2016 Bringing the Urban Forest Full Circle Conference, shined a bright spotlight on the design creativity of the entries that ranged from tables and wall hangings to a bell stand and soccer ball all crafted from urban wood. Read more.

1. First Release: Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide
A new national directory dedicated to helping connect tree care professionals, sawyers, woodworkers and other urban wood enthusiasts was recently released by the Urban Forest Full Circle Network. Read more.