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UK Researchers Search for Ash Borer-Resistant Trees

Before the emerald ash borer arrived, ash trees made up about 4% of the trees across Kentucky. World famous Louisville Slugger baseball bats were traditionally made from white ash.

Ash trees infested by the emerald ash borer can take up to several years to die after first being attacked. Yet, relatively healthy ash trees have been  discovered amid stands of dead and dying trees. These survivors are known as “lingering ash.” They are untreated trees that are still healthy in areas where more than 95% of the other ash trees have been killed by the emerald ash borer. 

Researchers at the University of Kentucky (UK) hope to use the seed and genetic material from these lingering ash trees for breeding programs and research purposes to develop ash trees that confer some resistance to the emerald ash borer.

“The idea is those trees that have some natural genetic resistance to the emerald ash borer are going to be the future of ash,” said Ellen Crocker, UK assistant professor of forest health extension in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “We’ve been trying to find some of these trees for several years now, and when we do, we get their seeds, so the Kentucky Division of Forestry can propagate them at their nursery and hopefully, get them back into the natural landscape.”

Identifying lingering ash trees may present a way forward for ash in North America, using seed and genetic material from these trees for breeding programs and research purposes, with the hope of developing ash trees that confer some resistance to EAB.

UK researchers are seeking the public’s help to find lingering ash trees. They said they can most likely be found in a stand where 95% or more of the trees have been dead for two or more years. The best lingering ash candidates would be greater than 10 inches in diameter.

In a similar vein, several years ago, the U.S. Forest Service and Ohio State University embarked on a collaborative effort to preserve and study the lingering ash through grafting, which allows both preservation and replication to study resistance to EAB. 

 

 



Waukesha County, WI, Urban Wood Program Among SFI Community Grant Recipients

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) announced 13 SFI Community Grants today featuring collaboration between 63 partner organizations in the United States and Canada, including two that dovetail with the development of a new SFI Urban and Community Forest Sustainability Standard.

One of SFI’s grants supports, “Promoting Urban Forestry and Harvesting Waste Wood,” a project being undertaken by Waukesha County, WI, to complete its urban forest management plans for wood that must be removed due to disease, pests, or other circumstances. This project is led by the Sustainable Resources Institute (SRI), which will help share this work so that other communities can benefit in their urban tree lifecycle planning processes.

SFI awarded a second urban forest grant to the Michigan State University Department of Forestry for its program Supporting Curriculum on Urban Forests, Carbon Storage, and a Changing Climate. MSU, through its work with SFI, will expand course content on forest carbon to create case-study-based materials for foresters, planners, builders, and decision-makers in cities and municipalities. The climate benefits linked with sustainable forest products and green buildings will also be featured.

“SFI’s commitment to making better choices for the planet also means better choices for its people,“ said Kathy Abusow, president and CEO of SFI. “Our grantees are leaders in their communities and we look forward to collaborating with them on so many important issues that will strengthen local communities and support solutions to important sustainability challenges.”

Other SFI grant recipients include:

Project Learning Tree’s (PLT) Forest Literacy Framework, which translates the complex language of forests, trees, forest practices, and sustainable forest management into accessible concepts that everyone should know and be able to integrate into their lives and careers. PLT is an initiative of SFI that provides activities for educators, community leaders, and families, including its flagship resource the Explore Your Environment: K-8 Activity Guide. The guide engages kindergarten through grade 8 students in exploring their environment through 50 field-tested, hands-on activities that integrate investigations of nature with science, math, English language arts, and social studies. There are more than 800 workshops across the U.S. every year organized to train educators on implementing PLT, and contributing to building a lifetime of learning for youth to build a green career pathway. The SFI Community Grants advance SFI’s education work with projects targeted at both youth and adults:

Teacher Tours in New Hampshire—The New Hampshire SFI Implementation Committee is bringing teachers together for a four-day workshop featuring forest and mill tours in July. Teachers will learn about the PLT curriculum, sustainable forest management, and forest products manufacturing, in order to engage students in learning about the natural world.

Creating Climate Training Module for Wood Producers—The Quebec SFI Implementation Committee will develop an interactive, user-friendly training module on climate change mitigation for wood producers that will align with the requirements of the SFI Sustainable Forest Management Standard which was launched on Earth Day this year.

Forest Literacy and Education on Forest Certification Standards—The Association forestière de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue will be engaged in learning opportunities focused on forest certification standards and the benefits of sustainable forest management, delivered to local schools and through in-person events at public libraries. Elevating forest literacy will help create better understanding around the connections of forests to solving sustainability challenges.

Sustainably Managed Forests Training for Architecture Students—Students at the University of Miami School of Architecture will experience timber harvesting in a sustainably managed forest. This will provide hands-on experience of the sustainable nature of forest-based supply chains and the emerging influence of forest products, such as mass timber, on climate-smart building design.

Community Training to Enhance Wetland Conservation Through Sustainable Forest Management—Ducks Unlimited Canada will provide training and resources to forestry students and Indigenous communities across Alberta to ensure better understanding of the role of sustainable forest management in effective wetland conservation.

Using Forestry and Natural Resources to Educate and Empower Women—Clemson University is helping to address the future that women landowners will play in sustainable forest management through this project. The Women Owning Woodlands (WOW) network will facilitate specific skills development for women landowners including chainsaw and pesticide safety.

Creating Equity in the Mississippi Forest and Conservation Sector—Working with the Mississippi Forestry Foundation, this project will involve outreach to new workers, military veterans, and dislocated workers as a way to increase every Mississippian’s opportunity and ability to join the forest sector’s green job workforce.

Promoting Understanding and Respect for Cultural and Medicinal Plants—The shíshálh Nation, SFI and other partners are building on an earlier grant to increase the cultural capacity of shíshálh members, support self-determination in the shishalh swiya (territory), and promote cross-cultural learning through providing cultural plant identification cards to local forest sector companies.

Creating Forest Career Pathways for Students—Friends of the Trinity County Resource Conservation District and Nor-Rel-Muk Wintu tribal members are working together to select locally tailored curriculum and produce high school field guide workbooks focused on Indigenous land stewardship, sustainable forestry, and related green career pathways to benefit the local workforce.

Engaging Citizen Scientists to Map the Birds of Newfoundland’s Sustainably Managed Forests—Birds Canada is engaging citizen scientists to deliver the province’s first breeding bird atlas to map the distribution and abundance of all breeding bird species in Newfoundland. Having solid baseline data about the distribution, abundance, and health of bird populations is essential for sound conservation and management decisions.

Creating Youth Advocates for Community Greening and Climate Action—SFI will work with the Medway Community Forest Cooperative in Alberta to plant tree saplings and conduct tree-health assessments over two years to engage younger generations as environmental champions who take local action on global issues.

SFI Community Grants are awarded for collaborative community-based projects, activities, or events that support SFI’s efforts to connect communities to forests. Projects supported have included providing educators with tools to showcase green career pathways for students, incorporating Indigenous knowledge into forest management planning and education curriculum, and building youth engagement in outdoor education and conservation projects. Since the SFI Grants started in 2010, SFI has awarded 96 Community Grants totaling more than $900,000 to foster community-building projects. When leveraged with project partner contributions, that total investment is over $5 million. Learn more: forests.org/communitygrants.



Twin City Closet Turns to Wood From The Hood for Reclaimed Ash Conference Table

Twin City Closet Company (TCCC) is mighty happy with the reclaimed ash conference table gracing its showroom in Mound, MN. The table, featuring a live edge top supported by a u-shaped base, was fabricated by Wood From The Hood of Minneapolis from 8/4 ash.

In a June 3 Facebook post, TCCC exclaims, “A big shoutout to our neighbors over at Wood From the Hood! Their wonderful shop reclaims and repurposes trees into beautiful wood products. When we opened our West Metro Showroom, they engineered a a new conference table out of an Ash tree. We’re proud to support their cause in preserving the natural beauty of Minnesota.”

Rick Siewert, co-owner of WFTH, says the ash tree used for the TCCC’s conference table was salvaged from within zip code 55406 of Minneapolis. “The table was designed by one of TCCC’s designers,” Siewert notes. “It has a light gray stain with a conversion varnish finish on it. The legs have an internal trough through them to hide electrical cords.”

TCCC also operates its flagship showroom in Minneapolis. The company has been providing the closet and home organization solutions since 1991.

 



SFI Commits to Developing Urban Forestry Sustainability Standard

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) announced the launch of a partnership to develop a new SFI Urban and Community Forest Sustainability Standard for application in North America and potentially globally. SFI will collaborate with five urban forestry leaders: American Forests, Arbor Day Foundation, the International Society of Arboriculture, the Society of Municipal Arborists, and Tree Canada.

“The SFI network is looking forward to collaborating with our urban forestry partners to promote the establishment of sustainable urban and community forests that meet local needs, while meaningfully contributing to national, bi-national, and global initiatives such as the 2 Billion Tree initiative in Canada or through regional and global initiatives such as the World Economic Forum’s 1t.org,” said Kathy Abusow, SFI’s President and CEO. “Together, with these leaders, I’m confident SFI will positively contribute to urban forestry initiatives across North America and globally.”   

“Urban forests are not just scenery — they are life-or-death infrastructure for our cities in a changing climate,” said Jad Daley, president and CEO of American Forests. “We must achieve tree equity our cities so that everyone has the vital benefits of trees for health, climate resilience, and economic vitality. We need all strategies employed to make this happen, including urban wood utilization, which can help address systemic economic barriers to urban forest management. We are thrilled to have the SFI Urban and Community Forest Sustainability Standard as a new tool for the urban forest movement, and to see Paul Johnson named as an ideal leader for SFI’s urban efforts.” 

Urban and community forestry involves both planning and management of the urban forest because the right tree, planted in the right place, in the right way, promotes the many benefits trees provide for people, wildlife, and climate. Community trees and forests provide many social and environmental benefits including, improved health and well-being, social cohesion and accessibility, outdoor learning environments, climate change solutions, reduced air pollution, and improved urban design.

SFI’s commitment to developing an urban and community forestry standard goes beyond the launch of this new partnership, it is also embodied in the decision to create a new staff position: Director of Urban and Community Forestry. Paul Johnson assumed this new role on March 15. Johnson brings over 20 years of urban and community forestry experience and deep connections to an international network of partners to his new role. As Johnson always says, “Trees are key to healthier, happier, safer communities.”

SFI, along with its partners, will set up a task group composed of leading experts to develop the new SFI Urban and Community Forest Sustainability Standard. The partnership and task group will explore opportunities to seek remedies for the climate crisis and other serious challenges that urban forests are ideally positioned to help address, including access to public spaces, social cohesion and more. Individuals interested in serving on the task group should contact Johnson at 202-719-1389; paul.johnson@forests.org.

About the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc.
SFI advances sustainability through forest-focused collaborations. We are an independent, non-profit organization that leverages four interconnected pillars of work: standards, conservation, community, and education. SFI works with the forest sector, conservation groups, academics, researchers, brand owners, resource professionals, landowners, educators, local communities, Indigenous Peoples, and governments. Collaborating with our network, we leverage SFI-certified forests and products as powerful tools to help solve sustainability challenges such as climate action, conservation of biodiversity, education of future generations, and sustainable economic development. Learn more: forests.org.

About Arbor Day
Founded in 1972—the centennial of the first Arbor Day observance—the Arbor Day Foundation is the largest 501(c)3 nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees. More than 1 million members, supporters, and valued partners have helped us plant more than 350 million trees in neighborhoods, communities, cities, and forests throughout the world to ensure a greener and healthier future for everyone. Our vision is to help others understand and use trees as a solution to many of the global issues we face today, including air quality, water quality, a changing climate, deforestation, poverty, and hunger. The impact we make on our world is accomplished through our conservation and education programs. We work to restore forests, improve tree cover in communities, and inspire the next generation of tree planters to ensure this important work endures. Learn more: arborday.org.

About Tree Canada
We are the only national non-profit organization dedicated to planting and nurturing trees in rural and urban environments. Through our programs, research, and educational efforts, we have helped restore tree cover in areas hit by natural disasters, guided communities in managing their urban forests, helped green 700 schoolyards, and organized urban forest conferences. To date, with our community partners and sponsors, we have planted more than 83 million trees. Learn more: treecanada.ca.

About American Forests
American Forests is the oldest national nonprofit conservation organization in the United States. Since our founding in 1875, we have been the pathfinders for creating healthy forests from coast to coast. In the early 1900s, for example, we rallied forest advocates to champion creation of the U.S. Forest Service. In 2018, we won a decade-long campaign persuading Congress to provide stable funding for preventing and fighting forest fires. Now we are focused on building a reforestation movement in America, from cities to large, rural landscapes. We all rely on forests to survive and thrive, given the power they have to filter our air and water, provide jobs, mitigate climate change and more. But our forests are being degraded and destroyed at a rapid pace and large scale. If we take care of our forests, they will take care of us. Learn more: americanforests.org.

About the International Society of Arboriculture
Through research, technology, and education, the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) promotes the professional practice of arboriculture and fosters a greater worldwide awareness of the benefits of trees. This is our passion and serves as our mission statement. ISA exists so that professionals, allied professionals, public officials, and consumers worldwide recognize the economic, environmental, and societal benefits and values of trees and their care at a cost that demonstrates the wise stewardship of resources. Learn more: isa-arbor.com.

About the Society of Municipal Arborists
Founded in 1964, the SMA is an organization of municipal arborists and urban foresters. Our membership also includes consultants, commercial firms, nonprofits, tree boards, tree wardens, allied professionals, and citizens who actively practice or support some facet of municipal forestry. A professional affiliate of the International Society of Arboriculture, the SMA has members from across North America and beyond. Through our magazine, City Trees, our conferences, our website and our many active members, we strive to create networking and educational opportunities that promote the sound, professional management of a vital and invaluable resource. Learn more: urban-forestry.com



Wudeward’s Owner Shares Vision & Passion for Urban Wood in Podcast

Dwayne Sperber, owner of Wudeward Urban Forest Products of Milwaukee, WI, was the featured guest of a recent Woodpreneur podcast, produced by Acre of Timbers.

Sperber is well known on the urban wood scene for his passionate involvement with Wisconsin Urban Wood and the Urban Wood Network. Wudeward is a business focused on supplying Wisconsin Urban Wood to architects, designs, builders and wood product manufacturers. 

Among many other things, Sperber presents his views of the current state of the urban wood movement, tips for developing a local urban wood network and how adopting industry standards – which are in the works – will help propel market demand for urban wood in the future.

Listen or watch the podcast.



The Greenfield, WI, Urban Wood Model

Greenfield, WI, a Tree City USA, has developed the Greenfield Model to repurpose trees removed by the city into lumber and other value-added products. The Greenfield Model is based on the Milwaukee Model and consists of three key players: the city, a container company and a medium-sized sawmill.

The model in use begins with training city tree crews in tree removal practices that that preserve their wood whenever possible. Greenfield estimates that it up to 30% of its tree removals are eligible for milling at Kettle Moraine Hardwoods, its sawmill partner. Sawn and dried lumber is sold to area companies and individuals. The other trees are used for things like pallets, mulch, biofuel, animal bedding, and firewood.

Read more about this Wisconsin Urban Wood success story on the Urban Wood Network’s website.

The GM began as a project between Wisconsin Urban Wood and the City of Greenfield and was facilitated by a 2016 grant from the WIDNR Urban Forestry Division.



Hoppe Tree Service Takes Full Circle Approach

Hoppe Tree Service of Milwaukee, WI, illustrates how a tree care specialist can branch out into producing urban lumber.

Hoppe Tree Service, is a full-service tree care company, that third generation owner August Hoppe says cut “our removed trees into firewood and not thinking anything of it.”

That approach changed in 2014, when Hoppe Tree Service purchased a launched the Urban Wood Lab and stated milling some of the logs of those removed urban trees into lumber. The company operates a retail store catering to professional custom woodworkers, hobbyists, etc.

In a 2017 interview with the Urban Wood Network, Hoppe said urban lumber sales were still a fraction of the company’s annual sales but had a great upside. “Right now it is still low, 3 to 5 percent of our business, but the company is growing at a fast rate. Within five years, I predict it will become between 5 and 10 percent of our revenue. Our goal would be to get to a place where we both remove trees and take on logs from other sources, becoming more of an aggregate of urban logs.”

To grow Urban Wood Lab’s business, Hoppe said, “We cross-brand to our existing client base. Telling the story of urban wood and providing the uniqueness of natural edge wood slabs are both working very well for us right now. We also participate in local networking and exhibiting events, such as home and garden shows. We market to anyone who has an appreciation for the uniqueness of wood.”

Read the full interview on UrbanWoodNetwork.org.

Learn more about the Urban Wood Lab.



IWF Urban Wood Seminar Delivered with a Tinge of Irony

As I went about last-minute preparations leading up to welcoming woodworkers to the August 24 urban wood seminar, I had to laugh.

Standing at the podium, I pulled a red and silver flash drive from my pocket containing all four of the panelist’s presentations. As I began inserting it into the laptop connected to the projector, I noted the device bore the logo “Allsteel,” The irony that I had uploaded our urban wood PowerPoints onto the thumb drive pf this metal office furniture manufacturer randomly fished from my collection did not escape me.

After briefly pausing to chuckle, I put on my game face and charged ahead with my opening remarks introductions of the expert panel representing three distinct urban wood utilization groups: Jennifer Alger, Urban Salvaged & Reclaimed Wood on the West Coast; Joe Lehnen, Virginia Urban Wood Group of the Southeast; and Dwayne Sperber, Urban Wood Network of the Midwest.

The 90-minute presentation was well received by the audience of professional woodworkers attending the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta. They came from coast to coast and Canada. Some had experience using urban wood in their products, others were curious to learn more about how they might do so. A few even expressed interest in trying to rev up urban wood networks in their home states where none currently existed.

The program had the support of lead sponsor Wood-Mizer, plus Richelieu Hardware, Dynabrade and Safety Speed Manufacturing. All four companies are long-time exhibitors of IWF, North America’s largest woodworking event.

Read more about the seminar, “The Urban Wood Revolution Is Now! Come Join the Movement,” in this month’s Illinois Urban Wood Update.

Also featured in this issue

Professional woodworkers are an important link in the chain to grow demand for urban wood. This is why being able to take to the stage of huge industry events like IWF, and benefit from all of the publicity that surrounds it, is an important component of the Urban Wood Network’s outreach activities to spur greater awareness of urban woods potential. Earlier this summer, the story of how Riverside, IL, repurposed an historic 160-year-old oak tree felled by high winds into custom desks for its trustees, was published in Woodshop News. The national publication is circulated to more than 50,000 print and digital readers.

Sam Sherrill, the dean of urban wood, helped examine the greener side of urban wood products. His research done in tandem with Steve of Dovetail Partners, quantified the benefits of furniture and other products made with urban wood to sequester carbon, thus reducing the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

Reminders
The second installment of the Urban Wood Network’s How To Do Urban Wood webinar series – Urban Lumber – How to Produce and Market It – takes place at 1 p.m. EST Wednesday, August 29.

The Wisconsin Urban Forest Fest is scheduled for September 15 at the Lynden Sculpture Garden in Milwaukee.

The lights are always on for receiving your urban wood stories, photos and experiences to share with the Illinois Urban Wood Update subscriber base.

Enjoy the issue!

Rich Christianson

Communications Director
Illinois Wood Utilization Team
info@illinoisurbanwood.org

P.S. Joe Lehnen texted me to let me know he had the “Allsteel” thumb drive, which I had left in the seminar room. I replied that he should hold onto it and that perhaps 10 years from now it would be a valuable collectable of the Urban Wood Movement!

READ THE AUGUST ILLINOIS URBAN WOOD UPDATE



Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide

The Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide is intended to provide starting points for land managers, arborists, sawyers, woodworkers and other stakeholders to join or create urban wood networks. This guide includes local, state and national urban wood utilization groups; state sawmill directories and selected reports, case studies and other publications.

The Urban Wood User’s Resource Guide is a work-in progress and as such is subject to change without notice. This guide will be periodically updated. For listing consideration, contact info@illinoisurbanwood.org.

NATIONAL & REGIONAL RESOURCES

Ash Utilization Options Project

Dovetail Partners Reuse

Emerald Ash Borer Info

International Society of Arboriculture

Reuse Wood

Southeastern Urban Wood Exchange

Sustainable Urban Forestry Coalition

Tree Care Industry Association

U.S. Forest Service Urban & Community Forestry

U.S. Forest Service Wood Education & Resource Center

Urban Salvaged & Reclaimed Woods

Urban Wood Network

Urban Wood Network LinkedIn

Wood Education & Resource Center, Northeastern State & Private Forestry

Wood-Mizer Pro Sawyer Network

STATE & MUNICIPAL RESOURCES”]TOGGLE STATE & MUNICIPAL RESOURCES CONTENT

Arkansas Sawmill Directory

California Urban Forests Council

Colorado CoWood

Colorado Tree Coalition

Connecticut Urban Wood Utilization

Georgia Arborist Association Urban Wood Reutilization

Georgia Wood-Using Industries Directory (See page 102 for urban wood listings)

Illinois Custom Sawmill Directory

Illinois Wood Utilization Team

Indiana: ElkhartWood

Indiana Sawmill Directory

Iowa: Davenport Urban Wood Utilization

Iowa Directory of Sawmills

Kansas Sawmill Directory

Kentucky Forest Product Industry Directory

Maine Stationary & Portable Sawmill Directory

Maryland: Baltimore Urban Wood Project

Maryland: Baltimore Camp Small Zero Waste Initiative

Michigan Forest Products Industry Directory michigan.gov/wood

Michigan: Southeast Michigan’s Reclaimed Wood Marketplace

Michigan Urban Wood Network

Minnesota Primary & Secondary Forest Products Directories

Minnesota Forest Utilization and Marketing Program

Missouri Sawmill Directory

Montana DNRC Wood Directory

Nebraska Sawmill Directory

New Jersey Sawmill Directory

North Carolina Urban Forest Council

North Dakota Sawmill Directory

Ohio Sawmill Directory

Ohio Wood Products Directory

Oklahoma Sawmill Directory

Oregon: Clackamas Urban Lumber Program

Oregon Forest Industry Directory

South Carolina Forest Mill Directory

South Dakota Log Finder

Vermont Urban Wood & Community

Virginia Urban Wood Group

Washington: Eastern Washington Small-Scale Sawmill Directory

Washington: Western Washington Small-Scale Sawmill Directory

West Virginia Forest Products Directory

Wisconsin Urban Wood wisconsinurbanwood.org

Wisconsin Urban Wood Use Options Directory

CANADA

Ontario: Your Leaf Toronto

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Assessment of Urban Tree Utilization & Forestry Programs of Richmond, VA, and Raleigh, NC

Case Study: i2i Design, Wood Dale, IL

Case Study: Riverside, IL Transforms Windswept Oak into Fine Furniture

Estimates of Carbon Dioxide Withheld from the Atmosphere by Urban Hardwood Products

Manufacturing and Marketing Eastern Hardwood Lumber Produced by Thin Kerf Band Mills

Marketing Urban Wood for Higher Uses in Illinois: Resources for Arborists and Managers

Recycling Municipal Trees: A Guide for Marketing Sawlogs from Street Tree Removals in Municipalities

Tree to Table: The Wood Cycle Story

Utilizing Municipal Trees: Ideas from Across the Country

Urban Forests & Urban Tree Use

Urban Wood & Traditional Wood: A Comparison of Properties & Uses

Using Urban Wood Clusters to Build an Urban Wood Utilization Network

Wood Utilization Options for Urban Trees Infested by Invasive Species



Wisconsin Urban Forest Fest Set for Sept. 15

 

Wisconsin Urban Wood (WUW), in partnership with the USDA Forest Service and the Lynden Sculpture Garden, will present the 2018 Urban Forest Fest 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, September 15 at the Lynden Sculpture Garden in Milwaukee. The event is sponsored by the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). Urban Forest Fest is an event to connect the public to the urban forest and its products.

Many people forget that wood comes from trees; Urban Forest Fest will make the connection between neighborhood trees and the wood products people use on a daily basis by telling the tree-to-table story.

Planned activities and exhibits include the Wisconsin Arborist Association Kids’ Climb, a sawmill demonstration, WUW members’ wood products and services, WEDC and the USDA Forest Service, along with music and food.

More than 500 people attended the 2016 Urban Forest Fest. View invitation to exhibit at the Fest.

The Lynden Sculpture Garden is located at 2146 W. Brown Deer Road, Milwaukee.

Save the Date: Urban Wood Symposium
Wisconsin Urban Wood also is in the planning stages of an Urban Wood Symposium geared for architects and designers, as well as municipal professionals including city foresters, park directors, public works managers, etc. The one-day program will feature a key-note address by Jessica Simons, representative of the Michigan Urban Wood Network and Michigan state lead for the Urban Wood Network. The event is tentatively planned for Thursday, Nov. 8 in the Madison or Milwaukee area.