Monthly archives: February, 2017

Indiana Tree Service Branches Out into Custom Urban Wood Furniture

Vine and Branch Furniture of Carmel, IN, is the featured cover story of the December/January issue of Hamilton County Business.

Vine and Branch Furniture represents the latest evolution of Vine and Branch, a tree service established in 1976. The company is led by Jud Scott, a registered consulting arborist with the American Society of Consulting Arborists.

Read the story about how Vine and Branch Furniture brings “New Life for Dead Trees.”

Learn more about the company at vineandbranchfurniture.com.



Repurposing Urban Wood Waste as Biomass

Wood-Chip-LandfillForest2Market recently posted an interesting article worth a read by all managers of urban wood, landfills and biomass operations.

“Urban Wood Waste: Are You Overlooking a Viable Feedstock?” delves into the potential economic benefits of burning urban wood waste to create power or heat instead of landfilling.

The article states, “Current economics favor funneling wood waste into the market, whether the market is for fuel, mulch or other uses. This is because the disposal of wood waste into a landfill adds zero net value. Rather, introducing wood waste into the market adds value as it can become a feedstock for a biomass power facility, for example.”

The Forest2Market article also looks at reasons for various stakeholders to look at using urban wood waste as biomass. For example, here’s some considerations for a landfill operation to make the shift:

  1. The landfill’s need for daily or intermediate cover (cover dirt is expensive and often difficult to find)
  2. State waste reduction goal credits the landfill might secure by using the wood waste for daily or intermediate cover
  3. A desire to save valuable landfill space for materials which have no alternative disposal options
  4. An end-market consumer with feedstock demand requirements.

Read the full article at Forest2Market.



Horigan Urban Forest Products Re-launches Website

HUFP-WebsiteHorigan Urban Forest Products Inc., one of Chicagoland’s longest-standing urban wood enterprises, has redesigned its website: www.horiganufp.com.

Horigan Urban Forest Products is owned and operated by the husband-wife team of Bruce and Erika Horigan. The company received the Governor’s Pollution Prevention Award in 2007. Bruce Horigan, a certified arborist since 1979, was honored with a Special Recognition award by the Illinois Arborist Association in 2008 for advancing the cause of wood recycling in the urban environment.

The company mills and dry kilns lumber, slabs and burls. The products are sold to professional woodworkers, hobbyists, consumers and others at its facility at 7255 N. St. Louis in Skokie, IL.

In addition, Horigan Urban Forest Products makes flooring, custom furniture and specialty items like picture frames and bowls from community trees.

Horigan Urban Forest Products is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Phone 847-568-1340 or visit the website, where you can also request to receive the company’s newsletter.



Video Update: TV News Features Restore’s Rescued Wood Project

Restore Rescued WoodLast month we posted a press release from the Habitat for Humanity Wisconsin’s Rescued Wood Program. It discussed the organization’s partnership with the City of West Bend, WI, in which city trees removed because of infestation by the emerald ash borer or other reason are sent to a local sawmill operated by Habitat for Humanity. Lumber milled from these trees is either being used in homes constructed by Habitat or sold at its Restore operation.

More recently, WISN of Milwaukee, an ABC affiliate, ran a report on the Rescued Wood Program. Here’s a link to the 2-minute feature: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-news/infected-trees-recycled-into-wood-for-homes/vp-AAmH5E2.

 

 

 



Video: Be a Smart Ash, Denver!

Be A Smart Ash: Reuse your urban tree, Denver!

That’s the title of a new video produced by the Denver Department of Parks & Recreation. The video highlights a variety of local sawyers and woodworkers who are keeping trees felled because of infestation by the emerald ash borer out of landfills.

Learn more about Denver’s Urban Wood Utilization program: http://coloradotrees.org/urban-wood-utilization/